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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
arolina,--all converging on Richmond. Preparatory to the next move, General Howard was sent from Savannah to secure Pocotaligo, in South Carolina, as a point of departure for the north, and General Slocum to Sister's Ferry, on the Savannah River, to secure a safe lodgment on the north bank for the same purpose. In due tine — in February, 1865--these detachments, operating by concentric lines, met on the South Carolina road at Midway and Blackville, swept northward through Orangeburg and Columbia to Winnsboro‘, where the direction was changed to Fayetteville and Goldsboro‘, a distance of 420 miles through a difficult and hostile country, making junction with Schofield at a safe base with two good railroads back to the sea-coast, of which we held absolute dominion. The resistance of Hampton, Butler, Beauregard, and even Joe Johnston was regarded as trivial. Our objective was Lee's army at Richmond. When I reached Goldsboro‘, made junction. with Schofield, and moved forward to Ra
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Marching through Georgia and the Carolinas. (search)
nothing but Wade Hampton's cavalry, and the more formidable obstacle of the Saluda River and its swamps, between us and Columbia, our next objective. As the route of our column lay west of Columbia, I saw nothing of the oft-described and much-discuColumbia, I saw nothing of the oft-described and much-discussed burning of that city. During the hasty removal of the Union prisoners from Columbia two Massachusetts officers managed to make their escape. Exhausted and almost naked, they found their way to my command; My mess begged for the privilege of Columbia two Massachusetts officers managed to make their escape. Exhausted and almost naked, they found their way to my command; My mess begged for the privilege of caring for one of them. We gave him a mule to ride with a comfortable saddle, and scraped together an outfit for him, although our clothes were in the last stages. Our guest found the mess luxurious, as he sat down with us at the edge of a rubber brink it, but these were on their backs with malarial disease at the end of the campaign, if not sooner. After passing Columbia there was a brief season of famine. The foragers worked hard, but found nothing. They made amends, however, in a day o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
A. G. Magrath, Governor of South Carolina, Columbia. Sir: I received to-day your letter of the 1point where the railroad from. Charleston to Columbia branches off to Augusta. Here we resumed theilroads in this section, the army started for Columbia, the capital of South Carolina, each corps taum) arrived at a point about three miles from Columbia on the 16th, and there received orders to crolry. The right wing (Howard) moved direct to Columbia, the Fifteenth Corps moving through the city en road. The Seventeenth Corps did not enter Columbia. During the night of February 17th the greater portion of the city of Columbia was burned. The lurid flames could easily be seen from my camp, forming a surgical operation on him. From Columbia the army moved toward Fayetteville — the leftsing the Union flag over the old State-House, Columbia. From a sketch made at the time. Three From Photographs. The unfinished Capitol, Columbia. the mule were two little pickaninnies, one [3 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of Bentonville. (search)
n's division, Army of Tennessee (Confederate), consisting of 2600 men, reached Columbia before the appearance of the enemy. In addition to the troops already mentione expressed were entertained at the time spoken of, for as I happened to be in Columbia then,--not on duty, however,--I urged upon General Beauregard, who had assumedrtant as Charleston was to us, Branchville, the junction of the railroads from Columbia, Augusta, and Charleston, was far more important. In these opinions, my recolence by a long march to North Carolina. When the Federal army appeared before Columbia, the only troops in and around the city were Stevenson's division, Wheeler's cin the city, for the troops were on picket duty from a point three miles above Columbia to one twenty miles below. Of course no defense of the place was attempted, a its fate in these brief and suggestive words: The army, having totally ruined Columbia, moved on toward Winnsboro‘. [See p. 686.] Stevenson's division, which was ab
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
e Twentieth Corps who had been near enough to that city, on a former occasion, to enable them to see the spires of her churches. Some had been in the first Bull Run, many more in the Seven Days battles about Richmond, nearly all of them had been at Chancellorsville, Antietam, and Gettysburg. After the repulse at Chickamauga they had been detached from the Army of the Potomac and sent by rail with all possible speed to Nashville. Thence they had marched via Chattanooga, Atlanta, Savannah, Columbia, and Raleigh to the point which, during the first two years of the war, they had struggled so hard to reach by approaching it from the north side. They had swung around the circle,--the largest circle ever swung around by an army corps. After resting a few days near Richmond we started for Washington over the battle-scarred route so familiar to the men who had fought under McDowell, McClellan, and subsequently under Grant, as well as to those who had served under Lee. The weather was pl