hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 273 19 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 181 13 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 136 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 108 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 71 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 57 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 54 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Columbia (South Carolina, United States) or search for Columbia (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
here was nothing to be gained by halting at either place. In his official report General Sherman says: Without wasting time or labor on Branchville or Charleston, which I knew the enemy could no longer hold, I turned all the columns straight on Columbia. From Columbia, after making a feint on Charleston, Sherman advanced to Fayetteville and Goldsborough, while preparations were making by the Federal Generals on the sea-coast to effect a junction with his army--one body of troops to advance fColumbia, after making a feint on Charleston, Sherman advanced to Fayetteville and Goldsborough, while preparations were making by the Federal Generals on the sea-coast to effect a junction with his army--one body of troops to advance from Wilmington, N. C., and the other from Newbern. All the troops that had occupied Charleston, Savannah, Augusta, Wilmington and other points along the coast, had united, and did all that was possible to impede Sherman's march; but, although the Confederate forces had swelled to a considerable army, they could not withstand the Federal advance, and from desertions and other causes they soon began to melt away. Still Sherman was not master of the situation until he had driven Johnston's army
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
a demonstration on Salkahatchee, while the gun-boats went up the Edisto and Stono Rivers to ascertain whether the enemy intended to hold Charleston or retreat to Columbia. It would require General Slocum at least five days to get his troops clear of the swamps near Savannah, and in the meantime General Howard was, apparently, movon by Bull's Bay and the Stono River was bravely undertaken, although it would have probably experienced a severe repulse but for the position held by Sherman at Columbia. The fall of Charleston was in every aspect a great success for the Union cause. Although it had long been nearly impossible for a blockade-runner to land hetered. The Chicora alone is visible in any part, and that only a few inches of the casemate at low water. Up a small creek was found a fourth iron-clad, the Columbia, of the same size as the Charleston, but plated with six (6) inches of iron; a new well-built vessel, just ready for service It seems that about a month befor
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
made to understand that there was anything fatal, in a military point of view, in Sherman's memorable march, though they received daily news of his successful marchings, his occupation of Atlanta, Rear-Admiral Henry K. Thatcher. Savannah, Columbia, and his advance to Goldsborough, driving before him an army quite equal in numbers to his own, before he was joined by Generals Schofield and Terry with some thirty thousand troops, and causing the ablest generals of the Confederacy to fall bac are always left in the tracks of such armies, and no General living could prevent it any more than Lee could prevent destruction on his march to and from Gettysburg. The fact is, the Confederacy was in its last throes when Sherman started from Columbia, and the people of the South everywhere (owing to what the promoters of the rebellion called the decay of public spirit ) were getting impatient with the hardships of the war, having no longer any confidence in the ultimate results. Yet there w
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
brought to bear on them. The Federal Army was ready to move as soon as General Grant should know to a certainty that General Sherman had reached Goldsboroa, where it was expected he would come in contact with General J. E. Johnston's army of some forty thousand men, which was being daily strengthened by Confederates who had evacuated Savannah, Charleston and Wilmington. This was one of the most anxious moments of the war. Hitherto Sherman had met with no serious opposition since leaving Columbia, but as he approached Goldsboroa the increasing numbers of the Confederates in his front gave evidence that he was to meet with strong resistance. Everything had been done by General Grant that was possible to reinforce Sherman. A column of troops from Wilmington and another from Newbern were dispatched to meet him, and to repair the railroads so that supplies could be rapidly sent to the Federal armies. All these movements were observed by the enemy with intense interest, and they hop
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
Key West Mar. 22, 1865 Beauregard. Sloop Resolute 563 25 122 53 440 72 do Mar. 22, 1865 Beauregard. Schooner Roebuck 9,071 02 974 53 8,096 49 do May 1, 1865 San Jacinto. Schooner Rebel 114 59 88 38 26 21 do Aug. 16, 1865 Roebuck. Schooner R. H. Vermylea 6,220 89 1,118 35 5,102 54 New Orleans June 29, 1865 Quaker City. Schooner Rob Roy 528 43 98 36 430 07 Key West Aug. 12, 1865 Stars and Stripes.   Rosin, 25 barrels, etc 20,494 47 3,091 81 17,403 66 St. Augustine   Pawnee, Columbia. Steamer Ruby 14,286 00 2,482 61 11,803 39 Key West Sept. 1, 1865 Proteus. Schooner San Juan 2,728 86 1,031 85 1,697 01 Philadelphia July 21, 1864 Susquehanna. Schooner Specie 10,214 86 1,275 91 8,938 95 do Oct. 17, 1862 Dale. Steamer Salvor 38,250 94 To claimants.3,029 19 31,842 57 do Jan. 14, 1863 Keystone State. 3,379 18 Schooner Sarah 21,454 10 1,671 22 19,782 88 do Nov. 26, 1863 Keystone State, Seneca, Norwich, Alabama, James Adger, Shepherd Knapp, Roebuck. Sch