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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 26 Browse Search
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war 20 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 13 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 12 4 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 10 4 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 10 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Columbus (Georgia, United States) or search for Columbus (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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ves his sceptre with a firmer grasp, and there is none who dare dispute his authority. The enormous price which cotton is now commanding completely falsifies the confident predictions of the false prophets that cotton, slavery, and everything else, would be ruined by secession, whereas secession has ruined nothing on the face of the earth except the prospects of unprincipled place-hunters, who would sell their country or their souls for an office in Washington.-- The old Union, says the Columbus (Ga.)Times, is dissolved; seven States are bearing arms and anticipating war, and yet cotton, the great staple of the South, the food of millions, the King of the world, is at the enormous price of 12 ½ cents per pound. It has not been so high for years. It goes up in the midst of a revolution, and despite the prophecies of Black Republicans and timid spirits is the border States, that commerce would be destroyed by secession, and the planters would suffer great loss in the reduction of the