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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 115 25 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 32 12 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 20 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) or search for Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Union? The first blood in our first mighty conflict was shed on her soil, and the first blow there struck for and in the defence of the rights of all. In the Senate, and in the field, throughout that great period, her sons were among the foremost in stirring eloquence, cheerful sacrifices, and matchless daring. Their bones almost literally whitened the soil of every State, and the Stripes and Stars when in their hands were ever the certain pledge of victory or death. Who would surrender Concord, Lexington, Bunker Hill? What American would give up the right to tread within the sacred precincts of Bunker Hill, and there to catch the patriotic Union spirit, which is the very genius of the place? She may have recently, no doubt she has, gone astray. But her error has been but the excess of her virtue. Her love of freedom has caused her to forget that, unless restrained, it soon runs into licentiousness. Her love of freedom has caused her to forget that with us, and as their fat
Gilman Marston, of Exeter; Lieut.-Col., Frank S. Fiske, of Keene; Major, Jonah Stevens, Jr., of Concord; Adjutant, Samuel G. Langley, of Manchester; Surgeon, George H. Hubbard, of Washington, N. H.; uarter-master, John S. Godfrey, of Hampton Falls, N. H.; Quartermaster-Sergeant,----Perkins, of Concord; Sergeant-Major,----Gordon, of Manchester; Commissary-Sergeant,----Cook, of Claremont. The feene--Capt., Tileston A. Baker; 1st Lieut., Henry N. Metcalf; 2d Lieut., H. B. Titus. Co. B, of Concord--Capt., Samuel G. Griffin; 1st Lieut., Charles W. Walker; 2d Lieut., A. W. Colby. Co. C, of Manover--Capt., Hiram Rollins; 1st Lieut., Samuel P. Sayles; 2d Lieut., W. H. Parmenter. Co. E, of Concord-Capt., Leonard Brown; 1st Lieut., Wm. H. Smith; 2d Lieut., A. I. P. Thompson. Co. F, of Littletd. Co. K, of Portsmouth--Capt., W. O. Sides; 1st Lieut., John S. Godfrey; 2d Lieut., John S. Sides. Rev. Henry C. Baker, of Concord, accompanied the regiment as Chaplain.--Boston Transcript, June 20.
Doc. 172.-the mob in Concord, N. H. Destruction of the office of the Democratic standard. A correspondent of the Boston Journal gives the following account of this affair: Concord, N. H., August 8, 1861. A very serious riot took place in this city this afternoon, which resulted in the total destruction of the printing office of the Democratic Standard. This paper has been too well known to require much comment in this connection. For the past few weeks it has reflected quite sConcord, N. H., August 8, 1861. A very serious riot took place in this city this afternoon, which resulted in the total destruction of the printing office of the Democratic Standard. This paper has been too well known to require much comment in this connection. For the past few weeks it has reflected quite severely upon the character and conduct of our soldiers, until they could endure it no longer, and concluded to take the matter into their own hands. Early this afternoon several soldiers of the First regiment went to the printing office, and asked for some of the papers, with the intention of purchasing them, and it is reported that the publishers refused to sell them. The soldiers afterward went into the street and by some means procured several copies; these were read to an excited and incre