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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 115 25 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 32 12 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 20 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) or search for Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
e Merrimac by two friends, of whom the younger was born at the mouth, Rogers's Writings, p. 158. and the elder near the sources, of that noble river—thus native to both of them. Mr. Garrison, on his part, fully responded to an invitation which was to gratify also his keen admiration for natural scenery. Lib. 11.147. This (in the main) pleasure excursion was the first ever undertaken by Mr. Garrison in his own country, and it made a lasting impression upon his memory. It began at Concord, N. H., on August 23, and ended at Conway on August 30; and in that time the Merrimac was ascended to the Franconia Notch, Littleton was visited, Mt. Washington ascended from Fabyan's, and the return made by way of the Crawford Notch. Rogers, in the Herald of Rogers's Writings, pp. 156, 193. Freedom, was the willing and graphic chronicler of the week's jaunt, which was put to anti-slavery account by Cf. Lib. 11: 147, 167. holding meetings along the route, with little aid and much obstruction
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
e instance the punishment was thirteen lashes; the offence, whispering on inspection to a shipmate who was treading on James Garrison's toes. All who remember Perry know what a disciplinarian he was, while yet no one accuses him of being a martinet. Brusque in his manners, he yet had a kindly heart (Rev. W. E. Griffis, in Mag. Am. History, 13: 425). John Randolph said in Congress that he saw more flogging on his voyage to Russia in 1830 (as American minister, on a Federal man-of-war, the Concord, Captain Perry) than on his plantation of 500 slaves (McNally's Evils and Abuses in the Naval and Merchant Service, p. 128. But see Griffis's Life of M. C. Perry, p. 85). We draw the veil over what followed, under the American flag, until James Garrison, a mere wreck, was rescued from the navy by his brother. But an earlier experience had in it an element which connects while it contrasts the lives of both. Towards the close of 1819, while Lloyd was in his early printer's apprentices
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
, Nov. 19, 1844. Ms. dear Garrison: The air here so tends to revive me, they will not consent I should return yet to Concord. I hope this will reach you in season to prevent your riding there in expectation of meeting me. I wanted to see you murom your hand. You could not intend it. But I cannot remark upon it. I only write to apprise you of my not returning to Concord. I am still very ill, but able to go out. Your affectionate friend, N. P. Rogers. Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb. ly, I fear. We shall soon know, for to-day he comes. N. P. Rogers to Elizabeth Pease. Ms. begun Apr. 4, 1844, in Concord, N. H., resumed July 25, and finished in Boston. Fragmentary. W. Phillips. Here a break-off again, and it is now Dec. 23,d. The State of Massachusetts had Lib. 14.202; 15.7, 26, 27. sent one of its most respectable citizens, Samuel Hoar of Concord, a lawyer and ex-Congressman, to Charleston, to test in the Federal courts the validity of the South Lib. 15.7; ante, p
ree States? Let us maintain the Constitution in letter and spirit as we received it from our fathers, and resist every attempt at the acquisition of territory to be inhabited by slaves (Hill's Memoir of Abbott Lawrence, p. 21). to a deed actually accomplished, but rebuked those of their colleagues whose conscience and Lib. 15.194. zeal outran their discretion as practical men. Meantime in Massachusetts a mass meeting for Lib. 15.146; Sept. 22, 1845. Middlesex County had been called at Concord to consider the encroachments of the Slave Power. Hardly a Liberty Party man was present, but Mr. Garrison again Lib. 15.154. endeavored to inspire his Whig political associates with his doctrine of action—to proceed as if they meant it when they declared the admission of Texas would be the dissolution of the Union: Sir, he said, I know how nearly alone we shall be. An Lib. 15.158. overwhelming majority of the whole people are prepared to endorse this horrible deed of Texan annex
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
quence, was heard with pleasure and without molestation. He received and accepted invitations even from New Hampshire. Parker Pillsbury, however, wrote from Concord, N. H., to Mr. Garrison: I take the liberty of calling your attention to the late Union Ms. Nov. 28, 1850. meeting in Manchester in this State, as reported in for fulfilling constitutional obligations (scilicet, slave-catching), in his 7th of March speech (Works, 5.355). the doctrines of the Manchester meeting. Men in Concord who, three months—and three weeks—ago, defended the higher law, are now its open scoffers—and influential men, too. Such cholera of the human conscience never before swept over a nation. Concord was not more responsive to Manchester than to Richmond, Va., whose Enquirer (of the date of the Boston mob), going into a rage over Thompson's reappearance in the United States, asked if the Government would tolerate him in silence. Does no law, no Power, exist to punish Lib. 20.194. a member <
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
ism, and throw them into the scale of freedom. It is an indication of progress, and a positive moral growth; it is one way to get up to the sublime platform of non-resistance; and it is God's method of dealing retribution upon the head of the tyrant. Rather than see men wearing their chains in a cowardly and servile spirit, I would, as an advocate of peace, much rather see them breaking the head of the tyrant with their chains. Give me, as a non-resistant, Bunker Hill, and Lexington, and Concord, rather than the cowardice and servility of a Southern slave-plantation. Their common human kindness and hatred of slavery, and their Old Testament inspiration, furnish grounds for an instructive parallel between Garrison and John Brown. He was of the old Puritan stock, said the former at Lib. 29.198. Tremont Temple; a Cromwellian who believed in God, and at the same time in keeping his powder dry. He believed in the sword of the Lord and of Gideon, and acted accordingly. Herein I d
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
ved that actual disruption of the Union can occur without blood. And if, through the madness of Northern abolitionism, that dire calamity must come, the fighting will not be along Mason's and Dixon's line merely: it [will] be within our own borders, in our own streets, between the two classes of citizens to whom I have referred. Those who defy law and scout constitutional obligations, will, if we ever reach the arbitrament of arms, find occupation enough at home. Independent Democrat, Concord, N. H., Sept. 17, 1863; Greeley's Am. Conflict, 1.513; Lib. 33.158. On the other hand, the acknowledged coming man of the Republican Party, William H. Seward, doubtless well content to have been absent in Europe during the John Brown excitement, landed in New York on Lib. 30.3. December 27, 1859, to the sound of guns in the City Hall park, and made a triumphal progress to his home in Auburn. Resuming his place in the Senate, where he was shunned Lib. 30.11. by his virtuous Southern colle