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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 115 25 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 32 12 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 20 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 19 3 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7.. You can also browse the collection for Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) or search for Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., An eighteenth century enterprise. (search)
ined the canal in Woburn, and who distinctly remembered the passage of the steamboat through the canal, and of the noise and smoke it made, this the more noticeable, as the canal passed through a deep cut and under the highway there. The writer has been acquainted with her for more than fifty years and her testimony is in the highest degree credible. After various experimental voyages through the canal, Mr. Sullivan made the ascent of the Merrimack river in his steamboat, and reached Concord, N. H., on June 15, 1819. It must have been a gala day there, as also those following, for during his stay of a week, Mr. Sullivan exhibited his steamboat Merrimack, and its capacity for service in various ways. Several passages were made to different points, towing loaded boats, and the General Court being in session, the members, with the governor and council, were treated to the novel experience, making the seven-mile trip up stream in one hour and fifteen minutes. On another trip, the gue