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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 60 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 58 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) or search for Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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all schooner through what is called the inside channel on the Gulf coast to Corpus Christi, the headquarters of Brigadier-General Persifer F. Smith, who was commandinrated between us a lasting friendship. A day or two after my arrival at Corpus Christi a train of Government wagons, loaded with subsistence stores and quartermas days to reach Laredo, a distance of about one hundred and sixty miles from Corpus Christi. Each march was but a repetition of the first day's journey, its monotony d of sleeping on the ground under the wagon, as I had done on the road from Corpus Christi to Laredo. I reached Fort Duncan in March, 1854, and was kindly receive. Captain Van Buren followed the trail by Fort Ewell, and well down toward Corpus Christi, day and night, until the Indians, exhausted and used up, halted on an openians was killed, and the rest fled. Captain Van Buren's men carried him to Corpus Christi, where in a few days he died. After our removal to La Pendencia a simil
the only Government having an existence over the territory where war is now being waged. You may notify the rebel commander west of the Mississippi-holding intercourse with him in person, or through such officers of the rank of major-general as you may select — that he will be allowed to surrender all his forces on the same terms as were accorded to Lee and Johnston. If he accedes, proceed to garrison the Red River as high up as Shreveport, the seaboard at Galveston, Malagorda Bay, Corpus Christi, and mouth of the Rio Grande. Place a strong force on the Rio Grande, holding it at least to a point opposite Camargo, and above that if supplies can be procured. In case of an active campaign (a hostile one) I think a heavy force should be put on the Rio Grande as a first preliminary. Troops for this might be started at once. The Twenty-Fifth Corps is now available, and to it should be added a force of white troops, say those now under Major-General Steele. To be clear on