hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 60 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 58 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 9 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) or search for Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, IV. (search)
gh ground, so healthy that they named it Camp Salubrity; and presently he was cured of his cough, and developed a reddish beard that is described as being much too long for such a youth. General Richard Taylor, of the Confederacy, remembers him at this time as a modest, amiable, but by no means promising lieutenant in a marching regiment. But Taylor could scarcely have held this estimate after Molino-del-Rey and Chapultepec. In the months of peace preceding, whether in Louisiana or at Corpus Christi, Grant's thoughts still saw the goal of a professorship; nor was his heart in the Mexican War, when it came. He pronounces it unholy, and he writes: The Southern Rebellion was largely the outgrowth of the Mexican War. Nations, like individuals, are punished for their transgressions. This forty years retrospect is consistent with his letter after Cerro Gordo: You say you would like to hear more about the war . . . . Tell them I am heartily tired of the wars. On the intellectual side,