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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 60 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 58 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) or search for Corpus Christi (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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From the Rio Grande --An Abolition Raid. Brownsville and Corpus Christi papers contain accounts of a boldly-attempted and timely-frustrated abolition raid on the Rio Grande, in Zapata county. It appears that about forty of the citizens (half-breeds) organized, armed and marched upon Carizo, the county seat of Zapata county, with the object of preventing the civil officers taking the oath of office prescribed by the Confederate States Constitution. After starting they were joined by a band of thirty more, all well armed and organized. This quite formidable force, after holding a council and pronouncing in favor of the United States Government, was proceeding upon Carizo when intelligence of the insurrection reached Col. Ford, at Laredo. Under orders from Col. Ford, Captain Nolan, with twenty-three men, advanced upon and attacked the insurgents — then numbering eighty men --at a point some eighteen miles from Carizo. and completely routed them, killing three and wounding s