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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) or search for Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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, and in a few minutes the rebel advance was in the centre of the town. They stated that they bore a flag of truce, and wished to be taken to the commandant of the post. I had just got word of the movement to Gov. Curtin and Gen. Brooks, at Hagerstown, when I was sent for to meet the distinguished strangers. A hasty message to Hagerstown and Harrisburgh, stating that the town was about to be surrendered, closed telegraph communication, and Mr. Gilmore, the operator, prepared at once for theHagerstown and Harrisburgh, stating that the town was about to be surrendered, closed telegraph communication, and Mr. Gilmore, the operator, prepared at once for the advent of his successors, and struck out along the line toward Harrisburgh with his instrument. I went up town to meet the flag of truce, and found a clever-looking butternut, dripping wet, without any mark of rank, bearing a dirty white cloth on a little stick. He politely stated that he sought the commander or authorities of the town, and in the name of the general commanding the confederate forces, he demanded the surrender of the village. He refused to give his name, or the name of the g
rom bodies of the enemy that would be able to resist it, you are desired to cross the Potomac above Williamsport, leave Hagerstown and Greencastle on your right, and proceed to the rear of Chambersburgh, and endeavor to destroy the railroad bridge ov and were supposed to be en route to Cumberland. We proceeded northward until we had reached the turnpike leading from Hagerstown to Hancock, (known as the National Road.) Here a signal station on the mountain, and most of the party, with their flagn the direction of Mercersburgh, Pennsylvania, which point was reached about twelve M. I was extremely anxious to reach Hagerstown, where large supplies were stored; but was satisfied from reliable information that the notice the enemy had of my appry real route and object. I started directly towards Gettysburgh, but having passed the Blue Ridge, turned back towards Hagerstown for six or eight miles, and then crossed to Maryland by Emmettsburgh, when, as we passed, we were hailed by the inhabit
ut off. Before I left Washington, and while it was yet time, I recommended to the proper authorities that the garrison of Harper's Ferry should be withdrawn via Hagerstown, to aid in covering the Cumberland Valley, or that, taking up the pontoon bridge and obstructing the railroad bridge, it should fall back to the Maryland Heighteemed no doubt as to the fact. The hasty retreat of the enemy's forces from the mountain, and the withdrawal of the remaining troops from between Boonsboro and Hagerstown to a position where they could resist attack and cover the Shepherdstown Ford, and receive the reenforcements expected from Harper's Ferry, were for a time inteed their line, and were posted upon the heights in the rear of the Antietam Creek, their left and centre being upon and in front of the road from Sharpsburgh to Hagerstown, and protected by woods and irregularities of the ground. Their extreme left rested upon a wooded eminence near the cross-roads to the north of J. Miller's far
y morning, (October eleventh,) at four o'clock, he received orders to start with his command, and was soon en route for Hagerstown, arriving there about eleven o'clock. There he was informed that the rebels were moving in the direction of Mercersbighth Pennsylvania cavalry, with Lieut. Pennington's battery of horse artillery. At eleven A. M. of Saturday they made Hagerstown. Thence they moved out on Clearspring road three miles toward Hancock, but were recalled to Hagerstown by a despatch fHagerstown by a despatch from headquarters. From Hagerstown they were ordered to Mechanicstown, which they made at eight P. M. of Saturday. Here they first got scent of the rebels, who were returning southward on their detour from Chambersburgh, and were reported as having Hagerstown they were ordered to Mechanicstown, which they made at eight P. M. of Saturday. Here they first got scent of the rebels, who were returning southward on their detour from Chambersburgh, and were reported as having passed a little town east of Mechanicstown, half-past 11 Saturday night. From Mechanicstown, Pleasanton set out in pursuit at one A. M., Sunday morning. At five A. M. he reached Frederick, and thence went directly south to the mouth of the Monocacy,
r effort to insure prompt transmission is made by the department of which Gen. Meigs is the head, they might as well remain in New-York or Philadelphia, so far as this army is concerned. I immediately called Gen. Meigs's attention to this apparent neglect of his department. On the twenty-fifth, he reported as the result of his investigation, that forty-eight thousand pairs of boots and shoes had been received by the Quartermaster of Gen. McClellan's army at Harper's Ferry, Frederick, and Hagerstown; that twenty thousand pairs were at Harper's Ferry depot on the twenty-first; that ten thousand more were on their way, and fifteen thousand more ordered. Col. Ingals, Aid-de-Camp and Chief Quartermaster to Gen. McClellan, telegraphed on the twenty-fifth: The suffering for want of clothing is exaggerated, I think, and certainly might have been avoided by timely requisitions of regimental and brigade commanders. On the twenty-fourth, he telegraphed to the Quartermaster-General that: The