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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 132 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Hudson River (United States) or search for Hudson River (United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 22.-Hudson River Baptist Association, report and resolutions, June 19. (search)
Doc. 22.-Hudson River Baptist Association, report and resolutions, June 19. The Committee appointed to consider the duties that pertain to our relation, as Christian citizens and Churches, to the nation at large and the Government that protects us, beg leave to report the following statement, preamble, and resolutions: The letters from the churches that compose this Association have expressed in the most solemn manner their sense of painful bereavement caused by the departure of their brethren, fellow-worshippers and Sabbath-school teachers from their various fields of labor to the camp and the battle-field for the defence of our country against an armed rebellion that seeks the utter destruction of the Constitution that shelters us, and is aiming fatal blows at the foundations of all effective Government, of all righteous law, of all social order, and of national prosperity. At the same time these letters declare, without any exception, the fixed determination of our brethren
the prevailing opinion among the soldiers is that they will have an easy victory over the North, and the officers do all in their power to inspire them with confidence. General Beauregard, about the close of June, in addressing his troops, assured them that he had a strong hope that on the Fourth of July he would dine at Willard's Hotel, in Washington; that he would then immediately march upon Philadelphia, from which point he would proceed to New York, and there alone, on the banks of the Hudson, dictate terms of peace to the Northern army. The cry among all the ultra-secessionists that they seek no compromise, that they will ask for no quarter, and grant none. Their troops strive to be armed to the teeth, as if they were bent upon a sanguinary contest. Many of them have good arms; others are supplied with ordinary regulation muskets. Some still use flint locks, some shot guns, and about eight or ten thousand have not yet been furnished with any guns at all. There is an immens