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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 360 128 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 94 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 8 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 42 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 38 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 37 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) or search for Huntsville (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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l garrison to hold the place. Heavy details were constantly employed in this work from October fifth to November first. On the twenty-ninth of September, General Morgan's division of the Fourteenth corps moved by railroad to Chattanooga and Huntsville to protect our communications, which were then threatened by General Forrest. The other two divisions moved with the main army in its operations against the army under General Hood. On the twenty-fourth of October, General Morgan's division reorgia, resting from the effects of the long and arduous campaign which ended in the taking of Atlanta, until the twenty-ninth of September, on which day, at an early hour, General Morgan's division (Second) left by railroad for Chattanooga and Huntsville, to operate against Forrest's forces, then threatening our communications in the vicinity of Decatur and Athens, Alabama. The other two divisions remained in camp, holding themselves in readiness to move against Hood, as soon as the object o
homas, left Chattanooga by rail October first, at half-past 5 A. M., for Stevenson, Alabama, and by subsequent order to Huntsville, arriving there at eight P. M. The track had been destroyed about twelve miles from Stevenson, and again about (4) four miles this side of Huntsville. October second, left Huntsville at half-past 5 P. M., by rail, for Athens; about four miles from Huntsville, found the track badly torn up; by heavy details, and working all night, (raining hard,) was ready to move Huntsville at half-past 5 P. M., by rail, for Athens; about four miles from Huntsville, found the track badly torn up; by heavy details, and working all night, (raining hard,) was ready to move by day-light to within two miles of Athens, when the track had been again destroyed, and bridge burned; marched from this point to Athens, here I found that the enemy had left the day previous; the gallant little garrison having replied that they werHuntsville, found the track badly torn up; by heavy details, and working all night, (raining hard,) was ready to move by day-light to within two miles of Athens, when the track had been again destroyed, and bridge burned; marched from this point to Athens, here I found that the enemy had left the day previous; the gallant little garrison having replied that they were there to fight and not to surrender. October fourth, left Athens at daylight (leaving the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth and part of the One Hundred and Tenth Illinois infantry to guard supply train which was to follow the command) and marched to