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efense, a cut and thrust movement, leading to no results save the taking of Corinth as an active factor from the arena of war. Its year for war's dread alarum's, with formidable muster of both armies, was emphatically 1862. In this battle the Third Louisiana was reported as losing 12 wounded; Dupeire's Zouaves 2 killed; Watson's battery was also engaged. The Confederates in two columns, meanwhile, had marched into the friendly State of Kentucky. E. Kirby Smith, commanding an army at Knoxville, took one line of the advance and defeated the enemy in a spirited action at Richmond, Ky. Smith's cavalry brigade, of which a large part was the First Louisiana, under Lieut.-Col. James O. Nixon, was commanded by Col. J. S. Scott. He drove the enemy from London, making heavy captures of prisoners and stores; fought a considerable engagement successfully at Big Hill, the enemy leaving 120 killed and wounded and over 105 prisoners; and on the occasion of the battle at Richmond attacked th
emy west of Chickamauga creek; on the 21st was in the attack on Missionary ridge, and next day, crossing the ridge, drove an Ohio regiment into Chattanooga, attacked the enemy in his intrenchments, and drove them from their first line of rifle-pits, then being recalled at night to the ridge. In this campaign, Dreux‘ cavalry, Lieut. O. De Buis, served as escort with General Bragg, and Captain Leeds Greenleaf's Orleans Light Horse had the same honor with General Polk. Capt. George V. Moody's Madison battery, coming with Longstreet, arrived too late for the battle. Later reports show the First Louisiana regulars, Col. James Strawbridge, and First cavalry, Maj. J. M. Taylor, attached to Bragg's headquarters. The Madison battery went with Longstreet into East Tennessee, where Colonel Alexander reported: One of my most gallant officers, Capt. G. V. Moody, was compelled to be left dangerously ill at a private house near Knoxville, and must have fallen into the hands of the enemy.
while sixty-three per cent of the Union guns were of heavier caliber. As the passage was open so that the fleet was not long under the fire of the guns, the forts had no advantage over the ships. General Duncan had made a gallant fight, but, after all succor had been cut off, he was compelled to surrender. After his exchange he acted as aide to General Bragg. But he lived only a few months longer to serve the cause which he loved so well. He died on the 18th of December, 1862, in Knoxville, Tenn., in his 36th year. Major-General Franklin Gardner Major-General Franklin Gardner was born in New York in 1823. His family moved West and he was appointed to the United States military academy from Iowa in 1839. After his graduation in 1843 and promotion to brevet second-lieutenant of the Seventh infantry he served in the garrison at Pensacola harbor, in scouting on the frontier, in the military occupation of Texas, and in the war with Mexico. He participated in the defense of F