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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 92 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 79 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 30 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 6 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 20 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 17 3 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Lawrence, Kansas (Kansas, United States) or search for Lawrence, Kansas (Kansas, United States) in all documents.

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d society. It is exceedingly difficult to eradicate these bands, inasmuch as the inhabitants of the country, sometimes from disloyalty, and sometimes from fear, afford them a subsistence and concealment. They usually hide themselves in the woods, and being well mounted, move rapidly from one point to another, supplying themselves by the way with provisions and fresh horses. They rob and murder wherever they go. In a recent raid of one of these bands into Kansas, they burned the city of Lawrence, and murdered every one they could, without regard to age or sex, committing atrocities more inhuman than those of Indian savages. These are the terrible results of a border contest, incited at first for political purposes, and since increasing in animosity by the civil war in which we are engaged, till all sense of humanity seems to have been lost in the desire to avenge with blood real or fancied grievances. This extraordinary condition of affairs on that frontier seems to call for the