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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 648 528 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 229 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 215 31 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 134 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 133 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 112 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 98 38 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 95 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 80 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Louisville (Kentucky, United States) or search for Louisville (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Doc. 16.-the battle of Mill Springs, Ky. this battle is variously known as the battle of Mill Spring, Logan's cross roads, Fishing Creek, and Somerset. Official report of General Thomas. headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky., Jan. 28, 1862. General orders, no. 40. The General commanding has the gratification of announcing the achievement of an important victory, on the nineteenth inst, at Mill Springs, by the troops under Gen. Thomas, over the rebel forces, soA. G., Chief of Staff. General Thomas's report to General Buell. headquarters First division, Department of the Ohio, Somerset, Ky., Jan. 31, 1862. Captain James B. Fry, A. A. G., Chief of Staff, Headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.: Captain: I have the honor to report that in carrying out the instructions of the General commanding the department, contained in his communications of the twenty-ninth of December, I reached Logan's Cross Roads, about ten miles north of
Doc. 45.-occupation of Bowling Green, Ky. Gen. Buell's despatch. Louisville, February 15, 1862. To Major General-McClellan: Mitchell's division, by a forced march, reached the river at Bowling Green to-day, making a bridge to cross. The enemy burned the bridge at one o'clock in the morning, and were evacuating the place when he arrived. D. C. Buell, Brigadier-General Commanding. Gen. Buell's General order. The following is a general order, issued by Gen. Buell to the troops of General Mitchell's division, after their advance upon Bowling Green: General order no. 70. headquarters Third division, Camp John Q. Adams, Bowling Green, February 19, 1862. soldiers of the Third division: You have executed a march of forty miles in twenty-eight hours and a half. The fallen timber and other obstructions, opposed by the enemy to your movements, have been swept from your path. The fire of your artillery, and the bursting of your shells, announced your arrival. Su
manity remained. The same boat also received a shot near the water-line, which, while it did not penetrate the hull, started the timbers so as to set her leaking badly. During the night, however, all damage was repaired, and this morning she is as ready for active service as ever. The total loss on the Louisville was six killed and eight or ten wounded. One of the other gunboats had some of her woodwork shot shot away, but was not materially damaged. The iron boats in action were: Louisville, Capt. B. M. Dove. St. Louis, Lieut.-Com. Paulding. Carondelet, Lieut.-Com. Kelte. Mound City, Lieut.-Com.-----. The other three boats were the wooden ones — Tyler, Lexington, and Conestoga. There is a boat about to leave for Cairo, and I have concluded to mail this without awaiting the result of the final assault. Affairs look encouraging — the Fort is completely invested, and will probably be stormed either this afternoon or tomorrow morning. The rebels have a flag flyin