hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 648 528 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 229 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 215 31 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 134 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 133 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 112 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 98 38 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 95 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 80 4 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Louisville (Kentucky, United States) or search for Louisville (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
ember 26th. Moved at dawn to creek at the foot of Big Hill to get water to cook with. Here was received orders to join General Bragg. On the 28th marched from Lancaster to Danville. Staid over the 29th to allow the men to wash. Passed in review before General Bragg. Marched on to camp at Salt river, near El Dorado. Passed through Salvisa, and camped at Lawrenceburg, where we spent the entire night serenading the ladies. At Rough-and-Ready, we heard that the enemy was moving out of Louisville, and we promised ourselves a fight. But after running the wagons back to the rear, it all turned out to be nothing —a mere cavalry report! We reached Frankfort on the evening of the second of October. This is the blue grass region-a lovely country and everything in the way of food for man and horse very plentiful. The one article of water we found scarce and indifferent everywhere in Kentucky. Our march was an ovation. The people crowded to the roadside. Ladies (and very pretty are
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
nger of being overwhelmed by Rosecrans, directed Morgan to create a diversion by marching into Kentucky and threatening Louisville. Being essential a free lance, accustomed to independent action, Morgan determined to cross the Ohio River, General Brd, Morgan deflected from the straight northward route, hitherto pursued, and marched westward to Bardstown, threatening Louisville. By this time the rough riders had become weary and sleepy. While the column was making the night march from Springfiederal cavalry. From Bardstown the Confederates marched rapidly to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River, forty miles below Louisville. Crossing the River. When the column reached Brandenburg, early in the morning of July 8, General Morgan was deli column moved eastward to Vienna, where Ellsworth captured the telegraph operator and put himself in communication with Louisville and Indianapolis, sending the usual fiction regarding Morgan's movements and receiving desirable information as to thos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
yed it. It has been said that in no battle in the Civil War was an army so completely destroyed as Nelson's was in this fight. At the same time General Braxton Bragg entered Kentucky from another direction with a strong force and advanced upon Louisville; and thus, for the first and only time during the war, nearly the whole of Kentucky was within the Confederate lines. During the six weeks it was so situated, a number of Confederate regiments was recruited in the State. On Sunday, August 3 as the Ohio Raid. Starting from his camp at Alexandria, Tenn., he marched as far as Shepherdsville, Ky., before beginning his retreat, fighting nearly every day. He destroyed the L. & N. Railroad from Munfordsville to within eighteen miles of Louisville, rendering it impassible for at least two months; captured 1,877 prisoners, including 62 commissioned officers; killed and wounded a large number of Union troops, and destroyed more than $2,000,000 worth of United States property. His own loss
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
iss.; served at Drewry's Bluff. Mortimer M. Benton, Louisville, Ky.—Born in Kentucky; midshipman U. S. N.; lieutenant C. SP. Claybrook-Midshipman U. S. N.; lieutenant C. S. N., Louisville, Ky.; served with Missouri State Guard; abroad and capturedrleston Station; flagship Charleston. G. W. Fisher, Louisville, Ky.—First assistant engineer C. S. N.; was assigned to duty in naval works. B. F. D. Fitch, Louisville, Ky.—Enrolled at Louisville, reunion, no record of service was given; was an Louisville, reunion, no record of service was given; was an enlisted man. Robert C. Foute, San Francisco, Cal.—Born in Tennessee; midshipman U. S. N.; lieutenant C. S. N.; served std steamers Pamlico, Gaines and Morgan. Robert Hunt, Louisville, Ky.—Seaman, served on cruiser Florida and on barks Tacony C. S. N., on James River Station. J. W. Hollywood, Louisville, Ky.—Engineer C. S. N.; served on steamer Morgan. ——Haywooderved on steamer Virginia No. 2. J. G. Minnigerode, Louisville, Ky.—Served on Mobile Station. William Pinckn