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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 171 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 84 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 60 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 54 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) or search for Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
partment that this morning I entered Mobile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaines, and encountering the rebel ram Tennessee and gunboatt from the south-west, and the sky cloudy, with very little sun. Fort Morgan opened upon us at ten minutes past seven o'clock, and soon aftern and Gaines — succeeded in getting back under the protection of Fort Morgan. This terminated the action of the day. Admiral Buchanan she hospital, I sent a flag of truce to the commanding officer of Fort Morgan, Brigadier-General Richard L. Page, to say that if he would allo wounded on board U. S. S. Hartford in the action with the rebel Fort Morgan and fleet, August fifth, 1864: Killed — David Morrow, quarter on the morning of that day, entered Mobile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaines, and encountering and overcoming the rebel fleet, I hith the Tecumseh, (a vessel that was invulnerable to the guns of Fort Morgan,) by a concealed torpedo, was a casualty against which no human
ing, I suppose, to be entirely cut off from Fort Morgan. At this time, by your order, the Metacoaction. A few minutes after seven o'clock, Fort Morgan opened upon us, and continued firing until ng our engagement of to-day, with the rebel Fort Morgan, and the rebel gunboats. 1. Shot carried by this vessel in the late engagement with Fort Morgan and the rebel ram Tennessee. Part of fornished, and occupied the rear of the line. Fort Morgan began firing at five minutes past seven A. icers. At five minutes past seven A. M., Fort Morgan opened fire, and at fiteen minutes past sevrrible conflict with the rebel batteries at Fort Morgan, the iron-clad Tennessee, and gunboats Selmd to-day on board this vessel while passing Fort Morgan, and during an engagement with the fleet oflties occurring this morning, while passing Forts Morgan and Gaines, namely: Killed — W. H. Davis in action yesterday morning, while passing Fort Morgan, namely: Daniel Godfrey, coal-heaver, mo[67 more...]
man; Geo. Major, seaman; James Thorn, seaman; Chas. Packard, ordinary seaman; Wm. Fadden, landsman; and Wm. C. West, coal-heaver — with the pilot of the Tecumseh, John Collins. Four others also swam to the beach, and were taken prisoners at Fort Morgan and immediately sent away. This information was received when communicating by flag of truce with the Fort. none of them, we were told, were officers. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, D. G. Farragut, Rear-Admiral Commanding W.nsacola, August 6, 1864. sir: Believing that we are the only surviving officers of the U. S. Monitor Tecumseh, we feel it our duty to report the circumstances attending her loss, and of the safety of a boat's crew. When nearly abreast of Fort Morgan, and about one hundred and fifty yards from the beach, a row of buoys was discovered stretching from the shore, a distance from one to two hundred yards. It being reported to Captain Craven, he immediately gave the vessel full speed, and attem