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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 472 144 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 358 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 215 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 186 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 124 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 108 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 97 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 92 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 83 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) or search for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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For a time, in 1861, the vaults under the broad terrace on the western front of the Capitol were converted into bakeries, where sixteen thousand loaves of bread were baked daily. The chimneys from the ovens pierced the terrace where now the freestone pavement joins the grassy slope, and for months smoke poured out of these in dense black volumes. The greater part of the loaves supplied to the Army of the Potomac up to the summer of 1864 were baked in Washington, Alexandria, and at Fort Monroe, Virginia. The ovens at the latter place had a capacity of thirty thousand loaves a day. But even with all these sources worked to their uttermost, brigade commissaries were obliged to set up ovens near their respective depots, to eke out enough bread to fill orders. These were erected on the sheltered side of a hill or woods, then enclosed in a stockade, and the whole covered with old canvas. When the army reached the vicinity of Petersburg, the supply of fresh loaves became a matter of
ame from Canada. A large number of reliable troops were necessary to take these men from the recruiting rendezvous to the various regiments which they were to join. The mass of recaptured deserters were put to hard labor on government works. Others were confined in some penitentiary, to work out their unexpired term of service. I believe the penitentiary at Albany was used for this purpose, as was also the Old Capitol Prison in Washington. Many more were sent to the Rip Raps, near Fort Monroe. On the 11th of March, 1865, President Lincoln issued a proclamation offering full pardon to all deserters who should return to their respective commands within sixty days, that is, before May 10, 1865, with the understanding that they should serve out the full time of their respective organizations, and make up all time lost as well. A large number whose consciences had given them no peace since their lapse, availed themselves of this proclamation to make amends as far as possible, and
, Stephen A., 15 Draft,68-69,215-16 Dry Tortugas, 156 Eaton, Joseph H., 130 Ellis, George, 51 Ely's Ford, Va., 384 Embler, A. Henry, 266 Emory, William H., 265 Enlisting, 34-42, 198-202 Envelopes (patriotic), 64-65 Everett, Edward, 16 Executions, 157-63 Faneuil Hall, 31,45 First Bull Run, 27, 251-53,298, 340,356 Flags, 338-40 Foraging, 231-49 Ford, M. F., 264 Fort Hell, 59,385 Fort Independence, 44 Fort Lyon, 255 Fort McAllister, 406 Fort Monroe, 120, 162 Fort Moultrie, 22 Fort Sedgewick, 385 Fort Sumter, 22 Fort Warren, 44-45 Fort Welch, Va., 162 Fredericksburg, 100,237,308, 391 Fremont, John C., 46 French, William H., 307,353 Fresh Pond, Mass., 45 Games, 65-66 Garrison, William L., 20 Geary, John W., 295 Georgetown, 298 Germanna Ford, Va., 317 Gettysburg, 54, 72,239, 259,273, 378,406 Goldsboro, N. C., 264 Grand Army of the Republic, 98, 228,268 Grant, Ulysses S., 115, 121, 240, 263,