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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 472 144 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 358 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 215 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 186 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 124 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 108 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 97 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 92 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 83 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) or search for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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n Buren, though it had opposed his election as Vice-President in '32, and as President in '36. Virginia, Alabama, and Missouri also supported Mr. Van Buren. Gen. Harrison was inaugurated on the 4th of March, 1841, and died barely one month thereafter. John Tyler — son of a revolutionary patriot of like name, who rose to the Governorship of his State--was elected Vice-President with General Harrison. He was originally a Republican of the Virginia school, and as such had supported Madison, Monroe, and, in 1824, William H. Crawford. Elected to the Legislature of his State in 1811, when but twenty-one years of age, he had served repeatedly in that body, and in Congress, before he was, in 1825, elected to the Governorship of Virginia by her Legislature. In March, 1827, he was chosen to the United States Senate by the combined votes of the National Republican, or Adams and Clay members, with those of a portion of the Jacksonians, who were dissatisfied with the erratic conduct and bitte
Xix. Our foreign policy—Cuba. Treaty with France Washington Jefferson the Monroe doctrine the Panama Congress secret intrigues for the acquisition of Cuba Edward Evereft on the proposition of France and England for a triplicate guarantee of Cuba to Spain the Ostend Manifesto William Walker and the regeneration of Central America Mr. Buchanan on Cuba Democratic National resolve of 1860 respecting Cuba. the foundations of our foreign policy were firmly and strongly laid during the Presidency, and under the councils, of Washington. To mind our own business, and leave other nations to manage their affairs, and to preserve, recast, or modify their respective governments, as to them shall seem fit and advantageous — to regard the rule actually established and operative in any nation as the rightful government of that nation, however widely divergent it may be from our own notions of what is wisest and most beneficent: such are its great cardinal principles. To Was
tier, went into the harbor of Indianola utterly unsuspicious of the transformation which had been there effected, and became April 20, 1861. an easy prey to the exultant Rebels. The defensive fortifications located within the seceding States were some thirty in number, mounting over three thousand guns, and having cost at least Twenty Millions of dollars. Nearly all these had been seized and appropriated by the Confederates before Mr. Lincoln's inauguration, with the exception of Fortress Monroe (Virginia), Fort Sumter (South Carolina), Fort Pickens (Florida), and the fortresses on Key West and the Tortugas, off the Florida coast. To offset these, they had full possession of Fort Macon, North Carolina, though that State had utterly refused to unite in the conspiracy, with the extensive and costly Navy Yard at Pensacola, and the Southern Arsenals, which their Floyd had crammed Mr. Edward A. Pollard, in his Southern [Rebel] History of the War, page 40, thus sums up the cheap
e channel, which the Merrimac, properly handled, would have crushed like an eggshell, and thus passed over without a check to her progress. Finally, on the evening of the 20th, he gave orders to scuttle all the ships but the Cumberland, preparatory to flight — as if this were not the very course to preserve them for the future use of the Rebels. The steam frigate Pawnee, Capt. Hiram Paulding, left Washington on the evening of the 19th, and arrived, at 4 P. M. of the 20th, abreast of Fortress Monroe. Here she took on board Col. Wardrop's regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, 450 strong, raising her fighting force to some six hundred men. She now steamed cautiously and slowly up the river to the Navy Yard, which she reached soon after 8 o'clock. Capt. Paulding had instructions from the Secretary of the Navy, directing him to take command at Norfolk, on his arrival there, and to act as circumstances should dictate; but, at all events, to save the public property from falling into th
er line of demarcation between the Old Dominion and new, or West Virginia, and pretty accurately discriminates the Counties wherein Slavery and Secession did, from those wherein they did not, at any time, predominate, yet three or four Counties — Monroe, Greenbrier, &c.--which geographically pertain to West Virginia, have, either voluntarily or under duress, adhered to Old Virginia and the Rebellion. note.--The originally proposed State of Kanawha included within her boundaries only the Counties of Virginia lying north and west of, but not including, McDowell, Mercer, Monroe, Green. brier, and Pocahontas--thirty-nine in all, with a total population in 1860 of 280,691, whereof 6,894 were slaves. The Constitution of West Virginia expressly included the five counties above named, making the total population 315,969, of whom 10,147 were slaves. It further provided that the counties of Pendleton, Hardy, Hampshire, Frederick, Berkeley, Jefferson, and Morgan, might also be embraced with
XXXIII. East Virginia—Bull Run. Ft. Monroe great Bethel Alexandria occupied Vienna Patterson's advance his flank movement to by no fault of Gen. Butler, who was ordered to take command at Fortress Monroe, whither he repaired on the 22d, and where he soon found himsethe narrow limits, or immediately under the frowning walls, of Fortress Monroe. So Gen. Butler soon found some ten or twelve thousand ConfedBendix and Col. Townsend neared each other; Ten miles around Fortress Monroe. and the former, mistaking the latter for enemies, opened fires: Fearing that heavy reinforcements would be sent up from Fortress Monroe, we fell back at nightfall upon our works at Yorktown. [No furong the line of the Potomac and Chesapeake, from Cumberland to Fortress Monroe, divided into three or four distinct armies, under the commandield, in and about Washington16,000 Under Butler, at and near Fortress Monroe11,000 Under Banks, in and near Baltimore7,400 Total86,400
by her officers in the infancy of Secession. Running out of Charleston on a cruise, the Petrel soon encountered the St. Lawrence, gunboat, and, mistaking her for a merchantman, fired at her as a summons to surrender. The St. Lawrence at once returned the compliment with a broadside, sinking the Rebel craft off-hand, with five of her crew. The residue, thirty-six in number, were sent to Fort Mifflin, on the Delaware, as prisoners. Gen. Benj. F. Butler sailed, August 26, 1861, from Fortress Monroe, as commander of a military and naval force whose destination was secret. It consisted of the fifty-gun frigates Minnesota, Wabash, and Cumberland, with four smaller national vessels and two steam transports, carrying 800 soldiers, with two tugs laden with supplies; the Naval force under the command of Corn. Stringham. Arriving the second night off the entrance through Hatteras Inlet to Pamlico Sound, it was found defended Hatteras. Explanations to the plan of the Bombardment of
were but 2,500 to our 4,000; the Army of the Potomac, now nearly 200,000 Gen. McClellan, in his deliberately prepared, loudly trumpeted, and widely circulated Report, states the force under his more immediate command on the 1st of December--that is, the force then in the Federal District, Maryland, Delaware, and the small patch of Eastern Virginia opposite Washington held by him — at 198,213; whereof 169,452 were fit for duty. This does not in. elude Gen. Wool's command at and near Fortress Monroe. On the 1st of January following, he makes his total 219,707; on the 1st of February, 222,196. strong, and able to advance on the enemy with not less than 150,000 sabers and bayonets, eagerly awaited the long-expected permission to prove itself but fairly represented in that casual detachment which had fought and won at Dranesville. In every other quarter, our arms were in the ascendant. The blow well struck by Butler and Stringham at Hatteras, had never been retaliated. The Rebel
confers with Jackson, 151; beats Runnells for Governor, 339; his death, 340. See Texas. Huger, Gen., commands near Fort Monroe, 529. Hughes, Francis W., 439. Humphrey, Rev. Luther, John Brown to, 297. Hunt, Gen. Memucan, 151. Hunter,the cutter Cass at. 413. Mobile Advertiser, The, citation from, 459. Montgomery, Col., captures Fort Scott, 185. Monroe, Jas., 75; 108-9-10; 154; 175; 266; 267. Monroe, Thos. B., sr., of Ky., 614; becomes a member of the Rebel Congress aMonroe, Thos. B., sr., of Ky., 614; becomes a member of the Rebel Congress and a Senator, 617. Monroe, Thos. B., Jr., 614. Montreal, the sheriff of, tempted to engage in slave-catching, 218. Moody, Col., (Union,) at Alleghany Summit, 527. Moore, Gov. A. B., of Ala., his dispatch to the S. C. Convention, 345; 347Monroe, Thos. B., Jr., 614. Montreal, the sheriff of, tempted to engage in slave-catching, 218. Moody, Col., (Union,) at Alleghany Summit, 527. Moore, Gov. A. B., of Ala., his dispatch to the S. C. Convention, 345; 347; orders the seizure of Federal property, 412. Moore, Gov. Thos. O., of La., calls a Secession Convention, 348. Moore, Col., (Rebel,) killed at Bull Run, 545. Morehead, Charles S., 509; 614. more, Hannah, her opinion of Oglethorpe, 32.