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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 472 144 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 358 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 215 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 186 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 124 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 108 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 97 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 92 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 83 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) or search for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Not afraid of Yanks. (search)
te Massachusetts lawyer and pseudo warrior. During the day a piece of artillery was brought up before Butler's tent for his inspection, and I recognized it as the gun of Sturdivant's latter which was captured the day before. Late in the afternoon we were taken down to Bermuda Hundred, where our quarters for the night were in a small frame house, subjected to the humiliation of being guarded by a company of negro cavalry. The next day we were put on board a steamboat on our way to Fortress Monroe. There was great activity at City Point; a steamboat had just arrived with a company of infantry. As we passed by they made a great show of brandishing their guns, drawing out their ramrods and sending them home with a loud, ringing sound. This was done, doubtless, for the purpose of impressing us with the fact of their being awful fellows to encounter, and what short work they were going to make of the rebels in the field. Arriving at the fort we remained there over Sunday. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Chaplain Matthew O'Keefe of Mahone's Brigade. (search)
rance Father O'Keefe was handsome and of robust build. He had deep blue eyes and an abundance of gray hair. Despite his austerity, he was fond of company and an entertaining host. Father O'Keefe was proud of his connections with the Confederate Army, and bore an intense love for the Southern people and the leaders of the Confederacy, with whom he had been so closely associated, both as a friend and as an adviser. Visited Davis in prison. When Jefferson Davis was a prisoner at Fortress Monroe, he was visited daily by Father O'Keefe, who consoled the leader of the Lost Cause during the bitter hours that he was imprisoned. He was invited by the widow of Mr. Davis to accompany the body of the latter to Richmond to be entombed. It is stated that it was the desire of Father O'Keefe that he should be buried with all the simplicity possible, but with the regulations in accord with his position in the Confederate Army, as he wished it to be known that he died as he lived, an un