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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 472 144 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 358 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 215 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 186 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 124 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 108 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 97 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 92 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 83 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 1, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) or search for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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would not be reopened. He had mingled much with the people of the South, and no people were possessed of higher moral integrity. He had never seen there a single African, although they were imported by cargoes to the coast of Cuba. If the business had ever been carried on in the Southern States, it was done on a far greater scale by the smuggling Yankees of the North. With regard to the difficulty of transit alluded to, in case Virginia went with the South, he believed that Fortress Monroe and the Rip Raps would belong to Virginia. He would rally under the lead of the gentleman near him (Mr. Wise,) and pluck the plume from the brow of the Lieutenant General.--He anticipated none of the difficulties spoken of by others. He again urged the necessity of secession.--Where were the interests of Virginia in a Northern Confederacy, when for thirty years they had been warring upon her and her institutions? If he were to agree to a union with the North, he would consider hi