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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 472 144 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 358 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 215 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 186 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 124 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 108 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 97 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 92 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 83 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) or search for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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l weather of the fall, we can be compelled to begin the campaign over again at Manassas and Romney on the North, and Fortress Monroe on the southeast, the rebel leaders expect that we will find the road to Richmond still less practicable in fall thaty in stating that Gen. Mc'clellan was never able to carry over 80,000 effective men into battle. When he landed at Fortress Monroe his muster roll exhibited 115,000 men of all arms. A considerable proportion of these — say 8,000 --were cavalry, o of sick. I will give one exceptional face which may cause you to shudder. When General Casey's division landed at Fortress Monroe it numbered 13,000 men, when his division was routed at Seven Pines it numbered less than 6,000 --all the rest were no division at all. Many of these losses were compensated by reinforcements--seven regiments — say, 6,000 men, from Fortress Monroe, and General McCall's division of 10,000 effectives from the Rappahannock. But even with all these reductions the a