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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 472 144 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 358 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 215 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 186 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 124 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 108 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 97 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 92 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 83 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 17, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) or search for Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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from the gunboats, with every prospect of their capture. We have heard our own Jossea on yesterday estimated at one hundred and fifty killed and a thousand wounded. A considerable proportion of those brought in had received light wounds. Altogether, the situation on the Southside is decidedly favorable, and Butler must look to his laurels. Indeed, it is not believed, that this redoubtable individual is in any position of danger, but either on board a gunboat or on the way to Fortress Monroe. Most of the prisoners brought in yesterday were genuine Yankees; but there were some few Dutchmen among them, who speak a word of English. The casualties in Kemper's Brigade. The following is a partial list of the casualties in Kemper's brigade, in the fight of yesterday. 1st Va. Regiment. Killed: Serg't J W Wynne, Corporal Jno A Via, co H; privates J Toomey, co E; A Figher, co I; R Walthall, co G; A Goven, co D. Wounded: Private W W Turner, co D, , slight;
ng our lines. The army has advanced on the Petersburg road, a distance of about eight miles, where it will remain for the night. Its left flank is protected by gunboats in the Appomattox, and its right by gunboats in the James. From Gen Smith's headquarters, it is easy to see the spires of Petersburg, and the general impression is that there will be no great impediment to our advance upon that town. The very latest dispatch from Butler's movements is dated 2 P. M. On Monday, at Fortress Monroe, where a steamer had just arrived with 200 sick an wounded. It says: There was no fighting yesterday. Our force were engaged during the day in throwing up entrenchments. Gen Butler designs entrenching from the Appomattox to the James river, a distance of some six miles. It is reported that Beauregard was reinforced during Tuesday night by two brigades from Lee's army, it was thought, but this seems to be very improbable, unless Lee should really be retreating from his pres