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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 330 40 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 128 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 124 14 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 80 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 46 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 21 11 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia, or Merrimac: her real projector. (search)
eeing the failure of Lieutenant Brooke's scheme, Constructor Porter then had another model made like the one he made at Pittsburg in 1847. [Italics mine.] Mr. Porter is mistaken as to the ship-carpenter. Mr. Joseph Pearce (Mr. Porter spells itmade, took it to Richmond personally, and submitted it to Secretary Mallory. As to its being like the one he made at Pittsburg in 1847, I can but say that the only reference to that model I have seen is in Constructor Porter's note of his relatiouilt that way by the Confederate States. Subsequent vessels were made after the model which Constructor Porter made at Pittsburg in 1847, with the ends above the water and protected like the roof. But the model made after the return of the ship-carpenter to the yard, like the one he made at Pittsburg, had its ends under the roof and submerged just two feet, and no vessels were ever built after that model in the Confederate States. When the Merrimac, after conversion, was floated, it wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A plan to escape (search)
led comrades. No surprise of the garrison can be effected without the firing of guns, and this will give the Sanduskians notice. They having an armory and arms, one thousand men can be got under arms to receive us before we could steam from here or cross over on the ice. 3. The most hopeful plan of escape from the island is to secure outside aid. IV. How Shall we Return South? In one of three ways. 1. By reaching the main land, procuring horses and marching through Ohio to Pittsburg or Wheeling, or through Kentucky to Virginia, or Tennessee, or Georgia. 2. By reaching the main land and moving up towards Toledo, or the Straits, to Canada. 3. By crossing the lake to Canada. When it is remembered that in the late gubernatorial election in Ohio the aggregate vote was upwards of four hundred and fifty-five thousand men; three-fourths of whom we may safely conclude are capable of bearing arms, to say nothing of the many garrisons and camps in the State, together wi