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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A banner with a strange Device (search)
s people. With him we may indulge in dreams of future glory to some extent gratifying. Let us indulge! The Southern Confederacy it would seem, is sick of ornithological devices. In cropping the eagle, it crops the whole feathered race. There were birds to be had for the catching — buzzards, vultures, condor, adjutants, flamingoes parrots, daws — but it will have nothing to do with them. In its present melancholy condition of political chlorosis it has a stomach only for snakes. At Montgomery the other day, after the Convention had concluded its pleasing labors of disintegration, the lovely ladies presented a banner to the delegates, whereupon was embroidered, probably by their own delicate digits a huge rattle-snake, so done to the life, that by the mere force of the imagination, he was distinctly heard to rattle. In hoc signo vinces, Mr. President! said the ladies, or rather they would have said so, if they had understood Latin. To be sure! the President responded. The w
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Montgomery Muddle — a specimen day. (search)
rink on, am I! We suspect that there are a sufficient number of Drawcansirs in the Southern armies who not only dare drink, and dare die for drink, but who would be very apt to die without drink ; yet we take it for granted that the men of Montgomery are all solid philosophers, who leave liquor to the poets and the common soldiers, and whose sole and sublime amusements are the construction of paper Constitutions, the begetting of bodies politic, the evocation of cash out of chaos, and the gd this over and over again, in numberless letters, of his own State of Virginia; and what is true of Virginia is true of her Southern sisters. Do the really intelligent men of these unfortunate States, imagine that acts of Congress, whether in Montgomery or in Washington, will bring wealth, industry, prudence, energy — lines of steamers, miles of railway, great commercial centres? Secede, and secede again, but the curse and blight of Slavery will still remain! It will be a lesson to the world
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Slave-Holder's honor. (search)
H. Russell, the peripatetic philosopher and friend of The London Times, complains, if we may credit a telegram from Cairo that his correspondence has been tampered with by the Rebels, his letters being altered, and in some cases not sent at all. Had this fact come sooner to the knowledge of Mr. Russell, it would, we fear, have diminished his relish for that celebrated bottle of Old Madeira which he drank near Charleston, and his appetite for the excellent official dinners eaten by him in Montgomery. If anything could diminish the self-satisfaction of The Thunderer, we should think it would be the publication of the fact that, for so many weeks, and upon such a subject, its sacred columns have been controlled by Davis, Cobb, and Benjamin. If anything could change to something like an inclination that stern neutrality which has puzzled us all, we should think it would be the discovery that in its august person, The Times has been made the victim of petty larceny by the descendants of