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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
y affairs over Virginia, the Confederate Government, as if equally impressed with the importance of the position, made another addition to the troops assembled there — of three regiments and two battalions of infantry. I was also instructed in Montgomery to take Lynchburg in my route, and to make arrangements there for sending forward to Harper's Ferry such force as I might deem necessary to strengthen my command. I found no available force there, however. The forces thus assembled were, t6th, had not been published to the army in orders, by the War Department, but was known to be in existence, for it had appeared in the newspapers. My conversations with General Lee in Richmond, and the President's oral instructions to me in Montgomery, had informed me distinctly that they regarded Harper's Ferry as a natural fortress-commanding the entrance into the Valley of Virginia from Pennsylvania and Maryland-and that it was occupied in that idea, and my command not that of a military
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
e two Federal parties united were at the same time moving to the north, after luring about a fourth of the town of Grenada, and the engines and cars in depot there. On the 17th an order was received instituting a court of inquiry to meet in Montgomery on the 15th, to investigate the management of recent affairs in Mississippi, and ascertain the causes of our disasters. Although the purpose of this investigation was to decide whether Lieutenant-General Pemberton or myself was responsible for Being summoned by the judge-advocate, Major Barton, to attend the court of inquiry, to be held in Atlanta, in relation to the loss of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, I set out for that place in the evening of the 2d of September, but stopped in Montgomery in consequence of intelligence received there that its time of meeting had been postponed. On the 6th, while still there, I received a dispatch from General Bragg, asking that a division of infantry might be hurried to Atlanta, to save that de
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
er with Lieutenant-General Lee, and from his headquarters to communicate with Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith, to ascertain what reenforcements for me could be furnished by their departments. He talked much more of military affairs in Virginia than of those in Georgia, asserting, what I believed, that Sherman's army exceeded Grant's in fighting force; and impressed upon me distinctly that his visit was merely personal. His progress to Lieutenant-General Lee's headquarters terminated in Montgomery; and his communications with the commanders of two departments, concerning military aid to me, subsided into a visit to that city. General Hood asserts in his published report, that the army had become demoralized when he was appointed to command it, and ascribes his invariable defeats partly to that cause. The allegation is disproved by the record of the admirable conduct of those troops on every occasion on which that general sent them to battle-and inevitable disaster. Their coura