hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The defence of Mobile in 1865. (search)
was made upon the eastern shore of Mobile bay, and from which he operated against detached outworks of comparatively little importance. We were infinitely relieved when we found the attack would be there — but never knew why; and until General Andrews told us in this chapter why General Steele's column moved from Pensacola up to Pollard, we had been at a loss to account for that movement. He says it was to prevent us from escaping Canby's army on the eastern shore and making our way to Montgomery I Such a route of escape had never been contemplated by us. We always feared lest he might intercept us on the Mobile and Ohio railroad, by which we ultimately moved away unmolested. Had Canby landed on Dog river, west of Mobile, and invested the city, he would have found his work shorter and easier, and might have captured my whole army. The city was level and exposed throughout the whole extent to fire from any direction. There were near 40,00 non-combatants within its lines of defe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last Confederate surrender. (search)
e Department of Alabama, Mississippi, etc., with headquarters at Meridian, Mississippi, and informed that President Davis would, at an early day, meet me at Montgomery, Alabama. The military situation was as follows: Sherman occupied Atlanta, Hood lying some distance to the southwest; Farragut had forced the defences of Mobile baye Tennessee river, and use every effort to interrupt Sherman's communications south of Nashville, I proceeded to Mobile to inspect the fortifications; thence to Montgomery, to meet President Davis. The interview extended over many hours, and the military situation was freely discussed. Our next meeting was at Fortress Monroe, whso moved. General Wilson, with a well appointed and ably led command of Federal cavalry, moved rapidly through North Alabama, seized Selma, and turning east to Montgomery, continued into Georgia. General Canby, commanding the Union armies in the Southwest, advanced up the Eastern shore of Mobile bay, and invested Spanish fort
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
s of all true lovers of liberty. We have this fac — simile in Valentine's splendid recumbent figure at Lexington, and hope to have it also when the Lee monument association shall have completed their work, and placed their equestrian statue at Richmond. Contributions to our archives are still gratefully appreciated. Among others we acknowledge the following: From Graves Renfroe, Esq., of Talladega, Alabama--History and Debates of the Convention of the people of Alabama, begun in Montgomery January 7th, 1861, by Hon. William R. Smith, one of the delegates from Tuscaloosa. This book contains the speeches made in secret session, and many State papers of interest and value, and is a highly prized addition to our library, as well as a renewed evidence of the interest taken in our work by our young friend, Mr. Reufroe. From Major Powhatan Ellis, of Gloucester county, Virginia--Hardee's Tactics (Confederate Edition) published at Jackson, Mississippi, 1861; a bundle of war paper
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the late General S. Cooper. (search)
ught into close official relations with General Cooper in the discharge of the latter's duties as Adjutant-General in the United States army. No one knew better than he did the character and qualifications of the soldier who joined him at Montgomery, Alabama. His clear conception of this fact was at once manifested by placing him at the head of the Adjutant and Inspector-General's Department, and afterwards making him a full general — the first on the list of five--the remaining four being GeGovernment to coerce a State, was to be employed without doubt, and conscientiously believing that would be violative of the fundamental principles of the compact of Union, he resigned his commission, which was his whole wealth, and repaired to Montgomery to tender his services to the weaker party, because it was the party of law and right. The Confederate Government had no military organization, and, save the patriotic hearts of gallant men, had little on which to rely for the defence of the