hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

often without arms. From the Confederate secretary of war authority was received for the raising of regiments for the Confederate service. Hundreds of applications to him for this service were declined for want of arms. Many leaders went to Montgomery and Richmond for authority to organize military commands, and returned without it. Some even marched their commands to the field inefficiently armed, and these importuned the war department for commissions. Hindman, Cleburne and Van Manning usck to the equipment of an army was the want of efficient arms, and yet, of the 60,000 electors in the State, 25,000 were enrolled the first year and transported to the fields of battle. The provisional government, which had been organized at Montgomery, adjourned to assemble at Richmond, Va., July 20, 1861. President Davis proceeded to the Virginia capital at once, and placed himself at the head of the executive department. Virginia ratified the ordinance of secession in April, and Gen. R. E
hburg, Va., in June, 1861. When Dr. W. H. Tebbs and Van H. Manning, a lawyer at Hamburg, Ashley county, early in 1861 organized two companies and marched them to Vicksburg, and from there tendered their services to the Confederate States at Montgomery, Ala., the secretary of war refused to accept them. Their officers then went to Montgomery, and by persistent entreaty succeeded at length in securing their admission into the army for the war. Captain Manning was an impetuous Southerner, as wasMontgomery, and by persistent entreaty succeeded at length in securing their admission into the army for the war. Captain Manning was an impetuous Southerner, as was Dr. Tebbs, and they had no idea of being refused, but insisted until they obtained marching orders for their little battalion. Manning knew Hon. Albert Rust, then a member of Congress from his district, obtained the assistance of his influence, and as Rust decided to enter the service, Manning urged him to return to his home at Champagnolle, raise eight more companies and follow on to some rendezvous, where they together could organize a regiment for the service during the war. Rust did so an
e, 1855, he was promoted to first lieutenant and made regimental quartermaster of that regiment. In March, 1858, he was promoted to captain in the quartermaster department and assigned to the staff of Gen. Persifer F. Smith, then in command of the Utah expedition. When the war became inevitable, Captain Cabell repaired to Fort Smith, Ark., and from there went to Little Rock and offered his services to the governor of the State. On receipt of a telegram from President Davis he went to Montgomery, Ala., then the Confederate capital, where he found the acceptance of his resignation from the United States army, signed by President Lincoln. He was at once commissioned major, Confederate States army, and under orders from President Davis left on April 21st for Richmond to organize the quartermaster, commissary and ordnance departments. Later he was sent to Manassas to report to General Beauregard as chief quartermaster of the army of the Potomac. After Gen. Joseph E. Johnston assumed