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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A list of Confederate officers, prisoners, who were held by Federal authority on Morris Island, S. C., under Confederate fire from September 7th to October 21st, 1864. (search)
Zzz=Capt. G. Fenley, 1st cav., Marion. Zzz=Capt. J. C. Talbot, 5th inft., Lake City. 1st Lt. T. S. Armistead, 8th inft., Marianna. Zzz=1st Lt. Sanders Myers, 4th inft., Appaalachicola. 2d Lt. S. M. Davis, 4th inft., Quincy. Zzz=2d Lt. R. M. Hall, 9th inft., Appaalachicola. Zzz=2d Lt. A. L. Bull, 5th inft., Tallahassee. Alabama. Capt. R. F. Campbell, 49th inft., Village Spring. Zzz=Capt. J. N. Chisholm, 9th inft., Florence. Zzz=Capt. J. N. Burton, 6th inft., Montgomery. Zzz=Capt. C. E. Chambers, 13th inft., Tuskegee. Zzz=Capt. L. S. Chitwood, 5th inft., Clayton. Zzz=Capt. J. W. Fannin, 61st inft., Tuskegee. 1st Lt. A. J. Armstrong, 46th inft., Columbia. Zzz=1st Lt. N. L. Bishop, 16th inft. Zzz=1st Lt. H. A. Chatbourne, 10th inft., Selma. Zzz=1st Lt. J. J. Andrews, Wheeler's Staff, Florence. Zzz=1st Lt. John P. Browlove, 4th inft., Tuskegee. Zzz=1st Lt. R. H. Adams, Wheeler's Staff, Fansdall. Zzz=1st Lt. A. J. Kirkman, 4th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Gen. C. R. Wheat, commander of the Louisiana Tiger Battalion (search)
It was, therefore, a most painful sacrifice to sever those ties which had been made more sacred by much service and suffering in their behalf. But he felt the call of a still higher and holier duty, and he obeyed; it was to stand in the lot, and to share the fortunes of his own people and kindred and family. In the spirit which animated that purest of patriots, R. E. Lee, and from a like stern sense of duty, he gave his hand with his heart in it to the South. Stopping but a day at Montgomery, Ala., then the seat of the Confederate government, to learn the situation of affairs and the probable opening of the campaign, he hurried on to New Orleans, where he hoped to raise a regiment of volunteers for immediate service. Before his arrival the Governor of the State, by authority of the Convention which passed the Ordinance of Secession, had put in commission all the officers of the large force already raised. But at the call for volunteers to go to Virginia, where it was certain th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life, services and character of Jefferson Davis. (search)
ive millions of Southerners from the Federal Union in 1861. If we are mistaken on the point, why does not some one attempt to show wherein and why? And yet again, on the 23d of February, after Mr. Davis had been inaugurated as President at Montgomery, it said: We have repeatedly said, and we once more insist, that the great principle embodied by Jefferson in the Declaration of American Independence, that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, is sound a North Carolina, Arkansas, and Tennessee, all seceded, while Kentucky, Missouri and Maryland were divided in sentiment. Jefferson Davis became by unanimous selection President of the Confederate States of America; the capital, first planted at Montgomery, was removed here to Richmond, and for four years the new republic waged for its life the mightiest warfare of modern times. There was something melancholy and grand, says a Northern historian, in the motives that caused Virginia at last to ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
s a sufficient cause for their action. South Carolina led the way on the 17th of December, 1860, and was followed by the others—Texas having been the last to secede. Her representatives subscribed the provisional Confederate Constitution at Montgomery on the 2d of March, 1861. On the 11th of that month these States, through their representatives, adopted the permanent Confederate Constitution. To understand the full effect of this important step, and how it was regarded by the great maje laws of the country as they stood when Mr. Lincoln was inaugurated on the 4th of March, 1861. But that there was nothing in Federal legislation obnoxious to the cotton States themselves at the time the Confederate Government was organized at Montgomery, is shown by the very first act of the Provisional Congress. Statute 1, chapter 1 of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, adopted on the 9th of February, 1861, is as follows: An act to continue in force certain laws of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ail flag both had evidently been in the post of honor—the forefront of the line of battle. Only a tattered remnant. Of all the old flags in the line there was none so ragged as that of Massenburg's Georgia battery. Only a few tattered remnants clung to the staff, and these were so faded that the colors were barely distinguishable. The crack companies. There were several volunteer commands in line that occupy distinguished positions. One of these is the Montgomery Grays of Montgomery, Ala., a company whose banner is adorned with the trophies of twenty-seven competitive drills, and ranks as high as any volunteer organization in this country. The uniform is one that would attract attention anywhere—a blue, gold-laced coat, and an enormous white shako with a gold tassel. The Grays had thirty-five men in line under command of First-Lieutenant U. S. Watson. They have an enviable war record, and several veterans marched with the company. Another fine command was the Washi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
ce; without arsenals, armories, founderies, manufactories, or stores on hand to supply those wants. Lee exerted himself to the utmost to raise and organize troops in Virginia, and when the State joined the Confederacy he was invited to come to Montgomery and explain the condition of his command; but his engagements were so pressing that he sent his second officer, General J. E. Johnston, to furnish the desired information. When the capital of the Confederacy was removed from Montgomery to RiMontgomery to Richmond, Lee, under the orders of the President, was charged with the general direction of army affairs. In this position the same pleasant relations which had always existed between them continued, and Lee's indefatigable attention to the details of the various commands was of much benefit to the public service. In the meantime disasters, confusion, and disagreement among the commands in western Virginia made it necessary to send there an officer of higher rank than any then on duty in that s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Lieutenants. (search)
ry, Richmond, Va. Henry Heth, United States Coast Survey. Robert Ransom, Jr., Weldon, N. C. Cadmus M. Wilcox, Montgomery, Ala. J. L. Kemper, Orange Courthouse, Va. Fitzhugh Lee, Glasgow, Va. W. B. Bate, United States Senate, Washington. enate. L. L. Lomax, Blacksburg, Va. P. M. P. Loung, Atlanta, Ga. T. L. Rosser, Charlottesville, Va. W. W. Allen, Montgomery, Ala. S. B. Maxey, Paris, Texas. William Mahone, Petersburg, Va. G. W. Custis Lee, Lexington, Va. William B. Talia Robert J. Henderson, Atlanta, Ga. James E. Harrison, Waco, Texas. A. T. Hawthorne, Atlanta, Ga. J. F. Holtzclaw, Montgomery, Ala. Eppa Hunton, Warrenton, Va. William B. Hardeman, Texas. N. H. Harris, Mississippi. Richard Harrison, Waco,ssissippi. William Miller, Florida. John C. Moore, Texas. Francis T. Nichols, New Orleans. E. A. O'Neal, Montgomery, Ala. R. L. Page, Norfolk, Va. W. H. Payne, Warrenton, Va. W. F. Perry, Glendale, Ky. Roger A. Pryor, New York. Lu