hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The case of the <rs>South</rs> against the <rs>North</rs>. [from New Orleans Picayune, December 30th, 1900.] (search)
of the soldiers discharged their muskets, killing three of the crowd and wounding five others. The captain and eight men were tried for murder and all were acquitted, except two, who were convicted of manslaughter. About this time parliament repealed all the taxes imposed by the act of 1767, except that on tea. Another act, passed in 773, permitted the East India Company to carry their tea into the colonies and undersell the smugglers of Dutch tea. Mr. Grady asserts, on the authority of Montgomery's American History, that nine-tenths of all they imported was smuggled from Holland. There remained only a duty of three pence per pound to be paid in the port of entry; but the importation was resisted in the principal importing cities, notably in Boston, where the smugglers organized a band of Mohawk Indians and dumped into the sea about $100,000 worth of tea. Parliament thereupon passed several retaliatory and repressive acts, by the first of which the harbor of Boston was declared cl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
he secession of South Carolina, he again said in the Tribune: If it (the Declaration of Independence) justified the secession from the British Empire of three million of colonists in 1776, we do not see why it would not justify the secession of five millions of Southrons from the Federal Union in 1861. If we are mistaken on this point, why does not some one attempt to show wherein and why? Again, on February the 23rd, 1861, five days after the inauguration of President Davis at Montgomery, he said: We have repeatedly said, and we once more insist, that the great principle embodied by Jefferson in the Declaration of American Independence—that governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed—is sound and just, and that if the Slave States. the Cotton States or the Gulf States only, choose to form an independent nation, they have a clear moral right to do so. And we know that this man was one of the foremost of our oppressors during the war, alt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The natal day of General Robert Edward Lee (search)
ause of preserving the old Blandford church, $3 of this amount having been contributed by Mrs. J. B. Richardson, and $2 by Mrs. Andrew Hero. The Chapter continues its subscription to the Confederate Veteran. In accordance with the State President, this Chapter contributed a Christmas box to the Soldiers' Home. Regular monthly meetings have been held by this Chapter, which have been well attended, and the Chapter was represented by delegates duly elected to the convention which met at Montgomery, Ala. During the year many valuable and interesting relics have been added to the Chapter's case. Respectfully submitted, C. B. Sholars, Recording Secretary. Mrs. Ada T. Richardson, Corresponding Secretary, reported that during the year she had written 140 letters sent out fifty-three application blanks, ordered sixteen certificates of membership, and eight badges. She received ten certificates to order badges from Nashville from National Recording Secretary. Ordered 500 postal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
course of safety. Chosen a delegate to the State convention, he signed the ordinance of secession and thence went to Montgomery as a member of the Provisional Congress of the Confederacy. From his arrival there until the fatal battle of Frederiof their criticisms has been blunted by time and their confidential character robs them of their sting. A. L. Hull. Montgomery, February 3, 1861. We got here to-day two hours late, the delay caused by a bad smash — up on the train about three 10,000 men and authorizing the President to receive into the service of the Confederate States 100,000 volunters. Montgomery, Ala., March 5, 1861.—The Texas members here are a very conceited crowd with very little of statesmanship among them. Theowed the organization of volunteers and preparations for war filled the interval until the re-assembling of Congress at Montgomery in April. Montgomery, April 19, 1861.—The atmosphere of this place is positively tainted with selfish ambitious sche<