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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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e the South. Give him war, pestilence, famine, anything sooner than that. With regard to the African slave trade, he said emphatically that the Southern Confederacy had done all it could to dispel the illusion in this respect. The South would never open the trade. There never was a greater delusion than a contrary belief. On the Free Trade question, he said it was the purpose of the Southern Government to support itself by duties on imports. A large majority of the members at Montgomery were in favor of such a measure. The Vice President takes this ground, and think ten per cent. would be sufficient to support the Government. As to the prohibition of inter-State slave trade, he said it was true this was in the power of Congress. If Virginia goes with the North he thought it would be prohibited. Whatever the South could do in that respect, under such circumstances, she would do. This, however, was not a threat. He believed if Virginia joined the South, it would no