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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 197 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 21 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 91 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 71 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 68 12 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 62 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 60 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 56 26 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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The meeting between the brothers was most affecting, and as our townsman, J. J. Wade, who is as true to the South as "is the needle to the pole," pointed out to the recreant son the blue hills of his own native county, in full view, and but a few hundred yards distant, and addressed him in tones of affecting pathos, many a manly eye was moistened, and many a stern heart beat quicker, as their possessor turned away to hide the emotion he could not suppress. Senator Phelan. The Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser says that Mr. Phelan, one of the Confederate States Senators from Mississippi, served his time at the printing business in the Democrat office, Huntsville, Alabama, where he was born, and afterwards conducted the Tuscaloosa Flag of the Union, both as printer and editor. He studied law in the office of his elder brother, Judge Phelan, in Marion, Alabama, and soon after returned to Mississippi where he rapidly rose to distinction. Senator Phelan has been a disunionist since