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every stipulation on his part. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Inspector-General. To His Excellency B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Kentucky. General Buckner to Governor Magoffin. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Paducah, June 15, 1861. sir:--On the 11th inst., I advised Governor Harrisennessee forces are peremptory. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Inspector-General. To His Excellency B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Kentucky. General Buckner to Governor Magoffin. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Paducah, June 15, 1861. sir:--On the afternoon of the 12th instant I reacof instructions to Col. Tilghman. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Inspector-General. To His Excellency B. Magoffin, Frankfort, Ky. General Buckner to Colonel Tilghman. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Paducah, June 15, 1861. sir:--The Commander-in-Chief directs that you call int
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 45.-skirmish at Patterson's Creek. Col. Wallace's official report. (search)
Doc. 45.-skirmish at Patterson's Creek. Col. Wallace's official report. Cumberland, June 27. To General McClellan:-- I have been accustomed to sending my mounted pickets, thirteen men in all, to different posts along the several approaches to Cumberland. Finding it next to impossible to get reliable information of the enemy yesterday, I united the thirteen, and directed them, if possible, to proceed to Frankfort, a town midway between this place and Romney, to see if there were rebel troops there. They went within a quarter of a mile of the place, and found it full of cavalry. Returning they overtook forty horsemen, and at once charged on them, routing and driving them back more than a mile, killing eight of them, and securing seventeen horses. Corporal Hayes, in command of my men, was desperately wounded with sabre cuts and bullets. Taking him back they halted about an hour, and were then attacked by the enemy, who were reinforced to about seventy-five men. The attack
d that they bore an important communication from Davis to the President of the United States. Col. Porter requested them to dismount, and approach with it on foot, a measure of precaution rendered necessary by the fact that the officer bearing the flag was accompanied by a larger escort than that (twelve men) incident to the presence of a flag of truce. His request was complied with, and he found their representation correct. The disunion officer proved to be a Capt. Tom Taylor, of Frankfort, Ky., (a connection of Old Zack's,) who bore a sealed letter from Jeff. Davis to President Lincoln, according to a representation upon its back, written and signed by Beauregard at Manassas, explaining the fact, and asking that Capt. Taylor might be facilitated in his mission. Col. Porter accordingly sent Capt. Taylor and his missive forward with an officer and an orderly, and directed the disunion escort to return forthwith into their own lines-himself and the picket guard with him, follo
duals in Fulton County, contrary to law and the authority of the Military Board, and said Military Board having passed the following order: military Board, Frankfort, Aug. 1, 1861. On motion of General Dudley, Resolved, That his Excellency, the Governor, be requested to take such steps as he may think best calculated fostated, forthwith to deliver up the same to the judge of the county court of the county in which he resides, to be returned by said judge to the State arsenal at Frankfort; and I make this appeal to the loyalty of such citizens in good faith, believing that they will promptly manifest such a signal poof of their fidelity to the lawgainst all disobedient offenders. [L. S.] In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my name, and caused the seal of the Commonwealth to be affixed. Done at Frankfort, this, the 3d day of August, A. D. 1861, and in the seventieth year of the Commonwealth. By the Governor, B. Magoffin. Thomas B. Monroe, Jr., Secretary of S