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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. (search)
g no means of transportation by which they could be taken away. The guns were of heavy calibre, having been mostly obtained from the Norfolk Navy Yard, where they had been abandoned by our forces early in the war. But for that affair, we would not have encountered so many forts in the South and West, and would have escaped the disgrace of having the public river way to Washington obstructed for so long a time. An expedition under Lieutenant Wyman penetrated the Rappahannock as far as Fredericksburg after this place had surrendered to the Army, and captured twenty small vessels and a quantity of stores. Some of his command also penetrated the Severn, Pianketank and North Rivers, and captured some small vessels that had, no doubt, been used in transporting goods and information from the Maryland shore. The Union vessels were frequently attacked by field-pieces and riflemen, but they always managed to give a good account of themselves, while they demoralized the enemy by their p
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
s, captured and destroyed. Most of this work had to be done at night, and throughout the war the most wearing vigilance was kept up by the different commanders and officers who had been employed in the Potomac flotilla. Besides the watchfulness required in pursuit of the blockade-runners, the flotilla was at all times ready to give its active and willing co-operation to any military movement, and this assistance was frequently called for. While the Federal Army was in the vicinity of Fredericksburg, in the spring and summer, the services of the smaller steamers were constantly invoked. They opened communication between military forces, cleared large numbers of torpedoes from the river, made it safe for the transports to move with supplies or troops, drove the Confederate bushwhackers from the banks of the river, and returned with the sick and wounded from the field of battle. The gun-boats that served upon this duty were of very light draft, purchased for this particular work,