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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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e initiative, and came to meet us; but if they had not, we would have gone to them. It is now reasonably certain that matters here were so matured that the military authorities were ready and determined to advance, and it was with a feeling of relief, perhaps, that the first booming of the cannon at McLean's Ford removed from us the responsibilities of that movement. We were not entirely prepared — as well prepared, at least, as we might have hoped to be. The forces of Gen. Holmes, from Fredericksburg, and of Gen. Evans, from Leesburg, were in the battle; and so, also, were the most of those from Gen. Johnston. But two brigades of Gen. Johnston's force--Gen. Smith's and Col. Elzey's — had not arrived. Hampton's Legion and Wynder's Sixth regiment of North Carolina had not arrived the night before. Many that had arrived from the sources mentioned above were without the provisions of a military life, and were too wearied for the most efficient military service; but still our forces ha
Doc. 36.-fight at Carter's Creek, on the Rappahannock River, June 24. U. S. Steamer Monticello, Off Fortress Monroe, June 25, 1861. Dear sir: In accordance with your desire, I send you a short statement of our action at Carter's Creek, up the Rappahannock River, which took place yesterday P. M. Agreeably to orders received from Flag Officer Pendergrast, we were relieved at our station off Cape Henry by the Quaker City, and caine up and reported on Sunday morning. Was ordered away Rappahannock River, which took place yesterday P. M. Agreeably to orders received from Flag Officer Pendergrast, we were relieved at our station off Cape Henry by the Quaker City, and caine up and reported on Sunday morning. Was ordered away in the afternoon and anchored in Lynnhaven Bay. Yesterday morning we steered up the Chesapeake Bay, and about 2 P. M., were at the mouth of the Rappahannock. Hoping to capture the rebel steamer Virginia, plying on that river, we steamed a short distance with the Cumberland's launch in tow, armed with a 12-pound howitzer. Seeing nothing of importance, we turned round, and, at the request of our pilot, sent the launch on shore with our gig in tow, fully armed and equipped for any emergency, alt
the boat, was heard to say that they would have her anyhow. The facts were immediately laid before Provost-marshal Kenly, who, suspecting it to be their intention to seize her quietly at night, get up steam and move out of the harbor, immediately ordered an armed guard on board, whilst part of her machinery was also removed by the officers. The return of Captain Thomas may have some connection with the movements of this party, or perhaps the seizure of the Mary Washington on her return trip. Colonel Kenly received information on Saturday of the whereabouts of Neale Green, and immediately despatched Lieutenant Carmichael to arrest him. The expedition has proved a moss successful one, and reflects credit alike on Colonel Kenly and the efficiency and determination of Lieutenant Carmichael. We learn from the passengers of the St. Nicholas that the schooner load of ice captured by the piratical expedition, and taken to Fredericksburg, sold for $4,000.--Baltimore American, July 9.
the object of giving battle in another position. The number under his command on the 18th July is set down at 17,000 effective men, and on the 21st to 27,000, which includes 6,200 of Johnston's army, and 1,700 brought up by Gen. Holmes from Fredericksburg. The killed on our side in this evermemorable battle are stated in the report to have been in number 393, and the wounded 1,200. The enemy's killed, wounded, and prisoners are estimated by General Beauregard at 4,500, which does not include constructed months before, and awaiting the advance of the simple-hearted but brave thousands who were expected to present themselves as victims? With the whole of Virginia to outflank these batteries in, with a shorter base of operations by Fredericksburg or Yorktown to Richmond, why were the gallant thousands precipitated on this deadly trap, so carefully laid for them at Manassas? A sacred proverb says: Vainly is the snare laid in the sight of any bird, but it was not so in this case. Ag