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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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plan I was to move the main army to Falmouth, opposite Fredericksburg, and there cross the Rappahannock on pontoon bridges, soon after commencing the movement in the direction of Fredericksburg, my telegraphic communication with Washington would beannock and Rapidan, with a view to moving rapidly upon Fredericksburg and holding the south bank of the river while bridges antry could have crossed both rivers and moved down to Fredericksburg, on the south side, but before the pontoons arrived, erce over the fords at that place with a view to taking Fredericksburg; but from information in my possession as to the condihe river at Snicker's Neck, about fourteen miles below Fredericksburg, and if the movements of the enemy favored the crossinenemy would be more surprised by a crossing at or near Fredericksburg, where we were making no preparations, than by a cross the river there is a plain, narrow at the point where Fredericksburg stands, but widening out as it approaches the Massapon
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
tions, will know how to defend or assault them. It should not be forgotten that the principal rebel successes have been behind intrenchments, as at Manassas, Fredericksburg, Richmond, Vicksburg, Charleston, &c., &c. It is an unpleasant duty to state that most of the Ninth New York, Colonel Hawkins, left this command on the thias gallant an army as was ever mustered under any sun, and commanded by an officer who has won laurels in every engagement, from the first Manassas to that at Fredericksburg. Such an army, commanded by such an officer as Longstreet, may be defeated; but such an event is scarcely within the range of possibility. In spite of theny accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson. Hooker's and Lee's forces. Up to the meeting of Congress, Hooker had made no report to General Halleck, and o
ointers as Lieutenant-Generals Hill, Hood and Anderson, and Major-Generals Picket, French and Garnett, &c. The Petersburg Express of the fifteenth of April reflected the Confederate expectations in regard to Longstreet's army, in the following: Our people are buoyant and hopeful, as they ought to be. We have in that direction as gallant an army as was ever mustered under any sun, and commanded by an officer who has won laurels in every engagement, from the first Manassas to that at Fredericksburg. Such an army, commanded by such an officer as Longstreet, may be defeated; but such an event is scarcely within the range of possibility. In spite of the high hopes of the South, the siege was raised during the night of the third of May (twenty-four days), after the construction of from eight to ten miles of covered ways, rifle-pits, field works, and the loss of the celebrated Fauquier battery and some two thousand men. The rebel press, with few exceptions, admitted the failure,
Rappahannock. During the presence of Longstreet's wing at Suffolk, Lee, with Jackson's wing, was confronted by the army of Hooker. Hooker was advised of every change in my front, and assured that I would hold Longstreet as long as possible in order that he might destroy Lee. He was urged to strike before aid could be sent to the Rapidan. Perhaps a division, or a portion of one, joined Lee, in spite of the interruption of the communications by Stoneman. Longstreet did not; for his horses and servants fell into our hands near Suffolk, on the fourth of May. No mention of his presence is made in any accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson.
t the chivalry had an opportunity of numbering exactly the force that was with him, and ascertained that this remnant did not exceed seventy men. So they contrived to collect various scattered parties from the neighborhood until they mustered three or four times the force of our retreating cavalry. Even with this advantage the miserable creatures dare not offer Colonel Dahlgren a fair field in open day. There were those of them who knew him — the gallant Ninth Virginia--had faced him in Fredericksburg with quite as great a superiority of numbers, and had been driven in every direction until they skulked out of the town like whipped curs. So they confederated in force where the road wound through a deep forest, and awaited the coming of the Union troop. This happened about midnight, and repeated volleys from these miscreants did their work all too well. The gallant youth fell, pierced by many balls at the head of his men, and even while his brave spirit still lingered about its
t at Culpepper, the army would cripple that of the rebels, and would cut it off from Richmond. Culpepper should have been occupied. It was at this time that General Burnside assumed command of the army, and unfortunately decided to march on Fredericksburg. the Fredericksburg campaign. The details of that campaign have already been so thoroughly examined by your honorable committee, as to leave nothing to be said in reference to it except, perhaps, that the cavalry bore no prominent parts placed in command of the cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac, and made a Major-General of volunteers, after the battle of Chancellorsville, and the campaign of Gettysburg began by my attacking the rebel cavalry at Beverly ford on the Rappahannock river, on the ninth of June, 1863. The rebels were defeated, and very important information was obtained relative to their proposed invasion of Pennsylvania, upon which General Hooker acted immediately, and moved his army toward Maryland. On th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 59. battles of Spottsylvania, Va: battle of Sunday, May 8, 1864. (search)
ve been in great danger of being cut off. The right of our line, then, commanded the Brock road near Todd's Tavern, the centre faced Spottsylvania Court-house, the left was disposed across the road leading from Spottsylvania Court-house to Fredericksburg, to which latter place our wounded had been sent. A reconnoissance on the left in the morning developed no strong force of the enemy in that direction. General Mott's brigade of Carr's division, Second corps, was detached from the right andps had moved to the left of Hancock and Burnside. At nine o'clock A. M., the army faced the enemy, still this side of Spottsylvania Court-house, in a line south-east by north-west, stretching across the road from Spottsylvania Court-house to Fredricksburg. Of the events of yesterday, consisting of the enemy's capture and our retaking of a position designated by a house on the extreme left of our line, you have had particulars. The position now occupied by the enemy in our front is one so
ose we were quietly withdrawn on the afternoon of Sunday, the eighth, and marched back to within about eight miles of Fredericksburg, on the plank-road. Here we bivouacked and made all the preparation we could for the coming trying march. We had alprevailed, and all were anxious to participate in the movement. We moved at daylight, marching in the direction of Fredericksburg until we had arrived within four miles of the city, when we struck off to the left of Spottsylvania Court-house to Hathe service into infantry. General Lee, following his successes, was closely pressing Grant down in the direction of Fredericksburg, giving the cavalry their share in the immediate work. In the meantime it seemed that a vastly organized force of sweeping far around, and tapping our most extended cavalry pickets on the right, on the telegraph road, leading from Fredericksburg to Richmond. Wickham's cavalry brigade--the nearest at hand — took up the pursuit about two hours behind the rear of
d our right wing, and suddenly emerged on the Spottsylvania and Fredericksburg plank-road, striking our rear and breaking out upon our trains.ers at a point a little north and west of the road leading from Fredericksburg to Spottsylvania Court-house, and about eight miles from the foine o'clock, our skirmishers reached the main road running from Fredericksburg to Spottsylvania Court-house. On this road the enemy's train we a front of operations in easy distance of our proximate base, Fredericksburg, while the enemy was at a long remove from his. In these relatire diverged on one of the main roads leading due southward from Fredericksburg, continued on during the night and the following day, and on Sahigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts that volunteered to cross to Fredericksburg in boats, under a severe fire, a year and a half ago, which theng his army to Washington. Others that he was marching back to Fredericksburg. Others again thought that he was making for Suffolk, to move
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, South bank of the North Anna river, Wednesday, May 25-- (search)
any possible victory that could be achieved there. To have been able to bring on a decisive engagement there would undoubtedly have been greatly to our advantage, for we had there a front of operations in easy distance of our proximate base, Fredericksburg, while the enemy was at a long remove from his. In these relations, a battle that would have effectually broken Lee's army would have placed us in the most advantageous position for destroying it in the retreat that would have followed. I thd over to their extreme right, Lee began to look out for his lines of retreat. On Friday night, May twenty, Hancock took up his march, advanced due east to Massaponax Church, there diverged on one of the main roads leading due southward from Fredericksburg, continued on during the night and the following day, and on Saturday evening, May twenty-first, occupied Bowling Green, with the head of his column at Milford, distant from the point of starting seventeen miles. He met no enemy. On the ve