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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
by them there is notorious. They were no less efficient at Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg, and the utility of the organization being now proven, it was no longer lefen! Yours very truly, H. B. Mcclellan. The Macon Light Artillery at Fredericksburg. Our gallant friend, Major N. M. Hodgkins, sends us the following note: con Light Artillery. Very respectfully, N. M. Hodgkins. The hero of Fredericksburg of whom General Alexander spoke in his admirable paper in our November (188e mighty deliverances at Manassas, Winchester, Port Republic, Chickahominy, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, were they not manifest overtures to us to have the God oard meanwhile at Mumfordsville and at Perryville, Ky. In December, at Fredericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated e. And with the talented Zariffa we say— From the war-graves of Manassas, Fredericksburg and Malvern Hill, Carrick's Ford and Massanutton, Fast the Shadowy Legions
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery service. (search)
h the additional duties of chief of ordnance. Under the influence of this order and the experience of the battles, the brigade-batteries, though not abolished by order, were during the summer gradually absorbed into division-battalions, numbering from three to six batteries each, and commanded by the division Chief. These battalions first appeared on the field as such at Second Manassas, and the service rendered by them there is notorious. They were no less efficient at Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg, and the utility of the organization being now proven, it was no longer left to division-commanders to effect, (in some divisions it had even yet been but partially done, owing to a lack of field-officers of artillery,) but it was formally adopted by order, and general orders from the War Department directed a similar organization in all the armies of the Confederacy. This was the intent of ¶ 2, General Order No. 7, Adjutant-General's Office, Richmond, January 19, 1863, though the lan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
on Chancellorsville. Yours very truly, T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. What a commentary upon the lives of these two great men! Yours very truly, H. B. Mcclellan. The Macon Light Artillery at Fredericksburg. Our gallant friend, Major N. M. Hodgkins, sends us the following note: Macon, Ga., November 17th, 1882. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.. My Dear Sir,—In your last (October and November), Generonel Edgar F. Moseley in Virginia, and Major Jos. G. Blount, of Georgia, commanded the batallion at the surrender, composed of Young's, Cummings's, Mitlers, and the Macon Light Artillery. Very respectfully, N. M. Hodgkins. The hero of Fredericksburg of whom General Alexander spoke in his admirable paper in our November (1882) number, as carrying water to the wounded of the enemy at the peril of his own life was, of course, Richard Kirkland, of South Carolina, of whom General Kershaw wrot
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
th the sword, for the mouth of the Lord-hath spoken it. Will ye, or will ye not? Thus was Jackson God's interrogatory to this people, saying to them: Will ye be like him, and be saved? Lo, there! What would a nation of Jacksons be? That may ye be! How righteousness exalteth a people! Shall this judgment and righteousness be the stability of thy times, O Confederate, and strength of thy salvation ? And these mighty deliverances at Manassas, Winchester, Port Republic, Chickahominy, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, were they not manifest overtures to us to have the God of Jackson and Lee for our God, and be saved? Here is the path; walk ye in it. And what said our people? Many honestly answered, Yea, Lord, we will, of whom the larger part walked whither Jackson did, and now lie with him in glory. But another part answered, Nay, and they live on such terms as we see, even such as they elected. To them, also, it was plain that Jackson's truth and justice and devotion to duty
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
And over the hosts fell brooding night. It was a drawn battle—and sadly the Potomac was recrossed at Shepherdstown. The fifth Company were not idle and were heard meanwhile at Mumfordsville and at Perryville, Ky. In December, at Fredericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated attacks of the Federal troops For the foe had crossed from the other side That day, in the face of a murderous fire That swept them down in its terrible ire: And t our brothers in the West took up and prolonged the dreadful note. Then our guns were never quiet; now their roar is heard only resounding down the corridors of time. And with the talented Zariffa we say— From the war-graves of Manassas, Fredericksburg and Malvern Hill, Carrick's Ford and Massanutton, Fast the Shadowy Legions fill. From the far off Rappahannock, From the red fields of Cross Keys, Gettysburg—the Wildernesses— From defeat and victories. Tired trooper—weary marcher— Grim
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
in command of the Army of Northern Virginia—Richmond, Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg. On the 3d of June, 1862, General Lee was assigned to command in person the Army of Northn the Potomac lines, and practically eliminating McDowell, who with his corps, remained near Fredericksburg, he suddenly descends with Jackson on the right and rear of McClellan, and ere thirty days hto Virginia. The winter of 1862 comes, and Burnside, succeeding McClellan, assails Lee at Fredericksburg on December 13th, and is repulsed with terrible slaughter. 1863—Chancellorsville. Withstyled it, is confronting Lee near Chancellorsville, and Early is holding Sedgwick at bay at Fredericksburg, Jackson, who, under Lee's directions, has stealthily marched around him, comes thundering id tread as when of old—Stonewall led the way. Soldiers of Manassas, of Richmond, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, of the Wilderness, of Spotsylvania, of Cold Harbor, of Peters<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
of the States of the Confederacy as to the one in which he had a local habitation and a name. Two Witnesses on Prison Mortality at Elmira. We should have printed before this the following letter but for the pressure upon our pages: Fredericksburg, Va., July 31, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones: Dear Sir,—I was captured near Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va., May 19th, 1864, and carried to Point Lookout, where I remained until July 4, 1864, when I was transferred to Elmira, New York. While the not known. Thinking that these figures will be of interest to the readers of the Southern Historical Society Papers, I send them to you to use as you may see fit. Very respectfully yours, J. S. Hutchinson, Pastor M. E. Church, South, Fredericksburg, Va. (Formerly private Company F, Tenth Regiment Va. Infantry). It will be seen that these figures substantially confirm those in the following extract from a statement made by Hon. A. M. Keiley, of Richmond, Va., and published by us in Vol
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. (search)
ess of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. Ladies, Comrades, and Fellow-Citizens: As I look upon these once famt memories throng about me. More than sixty years have passed since first I saw the light in Fredericksburg; and with them have passed away, one by one, my dearest and best loved of my youth, till nowty was found in their ranks, when the storm of war rolled over us. Had the men shrunk, these Fredericksburg women would have nerved and shamed them. But no man faltered. The fiercest onslaughts of twhich a Randolph received his antagonist's shot, and fired his own into the air. In fact old Fredericksburg had attained to that civilization which can dispense with the code, and God grant that she mever an unfilial act was justified by the event, this was. He was warmly greeted on reaching Fredericksburg by his uncle, General John Minor, who sped him on his way to Washington, and to his dying da