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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
born in Petersburg, Va., in 1841; grandson of General Wm. R. Johnson, the Napoleon of the turf, son of General James W. Pegram, and nephew of Colonel Geo. H. Pegram, the Confederate commander of the battle of Rich Mountain. W. J. Pegram left the study of law at the University of Virginia in April, 1861, and enlisted as a private in F Company, of Richmond, Va. Willie Pegram was of small stature and wore glasses, but he was every inch a soldier, and born to command. While in camp at Fredericksburg, Va., in May, 1861, he was elected a lieutenant of the Purcell Battery of Artillery, commanded by Captain R. Lindsay Walker (subsequently Brigadier-General), and distinguished himself by conspicious gallantry at Manassas, Cedar Run, Chancellorville and Gettysburg, attaining the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery. Under an act of the Congress of the Confederate States he was appointed to the provisional rank of Brigadier General, in March, 1865, and ordered to report to General R. E.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
nchester and pursued him to the Potomac. Learning that Shields, from McDowell's column at Fredericksburg, and Fremont, from the West, were hurrying to form a junction in his rear, he marched his olManassas—his capture of Harper's Ferry, and march to Sharpsburg—his march from the Valley to Fredericksburg—and his last great flank movement to Hooker's rear at Chancellorsville, Jackson showed the s at Gordonsville we expected to move towards Washington, at Louisa we expected to move on to Fredericksburg, at Hanover Junction we expected to move up the railway to meet McDowell's Column, and it waThe next day Jackson started on his famous march to join Lee in time for the battle of First Fredericksburg. Secrecy was a strong element in his character as a soldier. Third. His stern disciple of our beloved country. R. E. Lee, General. General Lee wrote Mrs. Lee from camp near Fredericksburg, May 11, 1863: In addition to the death of friends and officers consequent upon the late <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
t fought cavalry battles of the war, in proportion to the numbers engaged, was that between General Averill's Division of nearly 3,000 men, and Fitz Lee's Brigade of not more than 800 (many having been sent home to recruit their horses) at Kelly Ford on the 17th of March, 1863. The Confederates were victorious, and Averill recrossed the Rappahannock. Breathed's horse artillery covered itself with glory. It was here that the gallant Pelham, as General Lee spoke of him, in his report of Fredericksburg, was killed, a loss deeply deplored by the whole army. I refer again to Chancellorsville only to say that I do not think the value of Fitz Lee's service in screening and protecting Jackson's great flank movement, and by his quick and close reconnoisance, ascertaining and pointing out to Jackson where his lines could be formed to strike the enemy's rear and flank at the greatest advantage, is generally appreciated. With Stuart in the Pennsylvania campaign he saved the day in the fierc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
in B. Littlepage, Washington, D. C.—Born in Virginia; midshipman U. S. N.; lieutenant C. S. N.; served on steamer Virginia, in battle of Hampton Roads; Drewry's Bluff naval battle; steamer Chattahoochie, steamer Atlanta; abroad steamer Virginia No. 2; Semmes' Naval Brigade. James C. Long, Tiskilva, 11.—Born in Tennessee; midshipman U. S. N., master C. S. N.; served on steamer Virginia, battle of Hampton Roads, steamer Richmond, Savannah Station, steamer Albemarle. Daniel M. Lee, Fredericksburg, Va.—Midshipman C. S. N., and passed midshipman C. S. N.; born in Virginia; served on receiving ship United States, on steamer Jamestown, battle of Hampton Roads, battle of Drewry's Bluff, steamer Richmond, steamer Chicora, schoolship Patrick Henry; at the capture of the U. S. gunboat Underwriter; in Minor's boat expedition to Plymouth, N. C.; cruiser Chickamauga. M. W. McCoy, Evansville, Ind.—Sergeant of marines, served on C. S. cruisers Sumter and Alabama. A. F. Marmelstien, Savan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
bor. Loveless, Richard, private, wounded and captured at Sharpsburg (dead). Lewis, William O., private, wounded and captured at Hatcher's Run (living). Mauck, Wiliam F., private, wounded and disabled, Gettysburg (dead). Mills, Marcus, private, surrendered at Appomattox (dead). Mills, James W., private, missing. Mills, Alexander, private, missing. Mills, Charles, private, missing. Mills, Henry, private, wounded (living). Manks, Horace, private, killed at second Fredericksburg. Martin, William S., private (living). Martin, George S., corporal; the only man out of seventeen who came out safe at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864 (living). Mathews, James M., private, wounded at Seven Pines, badly (dead). Mathews, Robert, private, wounded desperately, May 6, 1864 (dead). Maddox, James. McFarland, William A., sergeant, wounded and captured June 3, 1864 (living). McFarland, Robert M., private, wounded at Spotsylvania (dead). Pomeroy, Thomas M., priva
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.68 (search)
shot, shell and minie balls. Colonel Montague gave command that captains should take their positions in the center and rear of their companies. Captain Coke said that he was going to stay by my side, on the right of my company. I said to him it was a very dangerous place, so near the colors. He said, Yes, everywhere is dangerous here. In a few moments he was shot above the knee and fell. The ambulance corps took him off the field, and he recovered to join us again before we got to Fredericksburg, in December, 1862. On we went until we reached a rocky knoll about, I should judge, seventy-five or one hundred yards from a stone fence, which the enemy were behind, pouring a shower of minies at us. At that point our loss was terrible. The ranks were so scattered, and the dead and wounded so thick, it seemed as if we could go no further. Our rear rank was ten or more paces in our rear, and we were in danger of being shot by our own men. Our flag was shot through seventeen times, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.69 (search)
ed at Drewry's Bluff. P. H. Shumate, died at home. George B. Schmitz, died in 1862. James Snead, wounded at Gettysburg and died since. William Stuart, captured at Williamsburg and never returned. George W. Toney, captured at Williamsburg and never returned; living. James M. Thompson, died in 1861. H. C. Thompson, living. John Pres. Thomas, killed at Gettysburg. Jeff. Thomas, living, but lost a leg. James Thomas, died in 1862. William H. Turner, wounded at Fredericksburg and died. Levi V. Vermillion, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. Crawford Vest, killed at Boonsborough, Md., 1863. John Wright, died in 1861. H. G. White, wounded at Drewry's Bluff, May 16, 1864; living. H. M. White, living. A. J. Whittaker, wounded at Williamsburg and died since the war. William M. Whittaker, living. This company was made up in Mercer County, Va. (now West Virginia), and was the first company from the county. It was continued as a part of the 24th Vi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), In Memoriam. (search)
d and adopted: Since the last meeting of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, it has lost by death two of its highly valued members, who not only in signal service in the field, in the Army of the Confederate States, but in enkindling reverence for the just cause since, have commended themselves by their example, not alone to us, but world-wide to those who hold truth and fidelity in regard. Richard Launcelot Maury, Colonel Confederate States Army, born in Fredericksburg, Va., in 1842; died at Richmond, Va., October 14, 1907; son of Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, the Pathfinder of the Seas, and by double line of that fugitive Huguenot band of exiles for conscience sake, whose influence is so marked in families of their extraction—he promptly gave allegiance to the South, enlisting in F Company, of Richmond, Va.; promoted to the rank of lieutenant, he was assigned to the C. S. Navy, and for daring service therein was further promoted to the rank of major