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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 114 4 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 40 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 4 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Topeka (Kansas, United States) or search for Topeka (Kansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

election for a Delegate to Congress, which the bogus Legislature had appointed to be held on the 1st of October. They called a Delegate Convention to be held at Topeka on the 19th of that month, whereat an Executive Committee for Kansas Territory was appointed, and an election for Delegate to Congress appointed for the second Tun Delegate to Congress. And, on the 23d of October, a Constitutional Convention, chosen by the settlers under the Free-State organization aforesaid, assembled at Topeka, and formed a Free-State Constitution, under which they asked admission into the Union as a State. The XXXIVth Congress assembled at Washington, December 3d, 1ained just before by sacking a little Free-State settlement, known as Palmyra. The Legislature chosen under the Free-State Constitution was summoned to meet at Topeka on the 4th of July, 1856, and its members assembled accordingly, but were not allowed to organize, Col. Sumner, Since known as Maj.-Gen. Edwin V. Sumner: fough
the prairie, with a rifle-ball through his vitals. Six weeks after the Osawatomie fight, Capt. Brown was in Lawrence, stopping over Sunday on his way home from Topeka, when the startling announcement was made that 2,800 Missourians, under Atchison and Reid, were advancing upon that town. Not more than two hundred men in all cothe wood, in order of battle, when the valorous posse turned and fled. They probably were already aware, though Brown was not, that a party of mounted men from Topeka were hastening to his rescue, and were then within a short distance Not a shot was fired, as they, putting spurs to their horses, galloped headlong across the pra was so general and so hearty that they soon left, never to return. Brown was joined, soon after this Battle of the spurs, by Kagi, with forty mounted men from Topeka, of whom seventeen escorted him safely to Nebraska City. He there crossed the Mississippi into Iowa, and traveled slowly through that State, Illinois, and Michig
a, 601-2. Julian, George W., of Ind., nominated for Vice-President by the Free-Soilers, 224. K. Kagi, J. H., a liberator of slaves, 286; rejoins Brown at Topeka, 287; is Brown's Secretary of War, 288; killed at Harper's Ferry, 292. Kanawha: see West Virginia. Kane, Judge John I., letter to from Polk, 169; his decisi of N. H., nominated for President, 222; elected 224; inaugurated, 224; 226; 227; appoints Reeder Governor of Kansas, 236; disperses the Free-State Legislature at Topeka, 244; 246; 270; directs the Ostend meeting, 273; in the Convention of 1860, 317; 497; his letter to Jeff. Davis. 512. Pierce, Gen. E. W., at Big Bethel, 530-318. Tompkins. Lieut. C. H., dashes into Fairfax, 533. Toombs, Robert, of Ga., 382: his dispatch to Georgia, 384; 88; a member of Davis's Cabinet, 429. Topeka, Kansas, Free-State Convention at, 240; the Legislature at, dispersed, 244. Toucey, Isaac, in the Dem. Convention, 317. Townsend, Col. F., at Little Bethel, 529