Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) or search for Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
The 23rd North Carolina Infantry. [from the Raleigh, N. C., news and observer, April 11, 1897.] Organized in 1861, as the 13th regiment of Volunteers. Historical Sketch of by H. C. Wall. Upon the secession of North Carolina, May 20, 1861, the convention passed an ordinance authorizing the raising and equipping of ten regiments of infantry, to be designated State Troops, the said regiments to be numbered from one to ten, inclusive, in the order of their organization, the enlistment in the same to be made for and during the war. Subsequently the raising of other regiments, as volunteers for the term of twelve months, was authorized, these to be, in like manner, numbered from one up, in the order of their organization. This distinction between State Troops and volunteers was kept up until the re-organization under the general Conscript Act, which went into effect on the 17th of May, 1862, when the order of numbering the regiment was changed by adding the volunteer regiment, as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
The Thirty-Eighth N. C. Regiment. [from the Charlotte (N. C.) observer, March 31, 1895.] Its history in the Civil war. Lieutenant-Colonel George W. Flowers, of this regiment, writes its splendid record in the army of Northern Virginia—Its Officers—a carefully written and valuable addition to the State's war history. The 38th regiment of North Carolina troops, was formed of volunteers who enlisted for twelve months, and was organized at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, North Carolina, January 17, 1862, under the command of Major J. J. Iredell, commander of the post. The regiment was composed of the following companies: Company A, Spartan Band, Duplin county—A. G. Mosely, captain. First Lieutenant, D. G. Morrisey; second lieutenant, Alsa J. Brown; junior second lieutenant, D. M. Pearsall. Company B, Men of Yadkin, Yadkin county—C. L. Cook, captain. First lieutenant, R. F. Armfield; second lieutenant, A. W. Blackburn; junior second lieutenant, L. F. Haynes. Company C, S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. (search)
The private soldier of the C. S. Army, and as Exemplified by the Representation from North Carolina. An address by Hon. R. T. Bennett, late Colonel 14th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. before the Ladies' Memorial Association at Raleigh, N. C., May 10, 1897. Madam President, Ladies of the Memorial Association, My Countrymen . Every people has its heroes—of these heroes some are enshrined as champions of human liberty. There are many elevations between the level of the plain and the height of Parnassus. From the outbreak of the war between the Government and the Confederate States until Palm Sunday, in 1865, when the unpowerful regiments of the Army of Northern Virginia lowered their banners and dispersed to find ruined homes and a country girded with sackcloth and sprinkled with ashes, the United States employed 1,700 regiments of infantry, 270 regiments of cavalry and 900 batteries of artillery, an estimated total in excess of 2,600,000 men. Against this for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
ey are connected with the operations of the regiment, and its participation in the various engagements described have been used without reserve, as they are known to be correct; nor has there been any hesitancy in quoting from the language of that address when appropriate to a description of events constituting alike a part of the history of the regiment as well as of the brigade. Chas. M. Stedman. The 44th Regiment North Carolina Troops (Infantry) was organized at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, N. C., on the 28th of March, 1862, with George B. Singletary as its colonel; Richard C. Cotten, captain Co. E, its lieutenant-colonel, and Elisha Cromwe 1, captain Co. B, as its major. Colonel Singletary was killed in a skirmish with Federal troops at Tranter's creek in Eastern North Carolina on the 5th day of June, 1862. He was an officer of extraordinary merit, and would have unquestionably attained high distinction but for his untimely end. On the 28th of June, 1862, Thomas C. Singletary,