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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 208 34 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 109 39 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 21, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 3 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) or search for Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

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rne no traveler returns,' because no one as yet has ever reached it." We have no really national airs. "Yankee Doodle" is an unmeaning melody of foreign origin. As our correspondent says, it was played in derision of the Americans, by the British lifers during the Revolutionary war — Its true origin is from an unsuccessful oratorio, entitled "Ulysses," composed by William Smith. "Hail Columbia," originally the old "President's March," was composed by the German leader of the band at Trenton, after the battle. The "Star Spangled Banner is the old Irish tune of Bibo. The more modern song, so popular with the Unionists, Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean," claims its origin from John Bull. Its transatlantic title was "Britannia, thou Gem of the Ocean." "Our Flag is There," another song tending towards nationality, is said to have been composed in South America. Our National melodies should possess a distinct character of their own; but, if we are to depend on any people for th