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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
ly conflict, cherish personal rage against the enemy, any more than an officer of the law hates the victim of the law. How often does a victorious army tenderly care for the dead and wounded of the vanquished. War is a tremendous scourge which Providence sometimes uses to chastise proud and wicked nations. Both parties must suffer, even though one may get the advantage. There is no occasion, then, for adding to the intrinsic evils of the system the odious feature of animosity to individuals. the Gospel at the North are breathing out, in their very prayers and sermons, threatenings and slaughter against us! Oh! how painful that a gray-headed pastor should publicly exclaim, I would hang them as soon as I would shoot a mad dog. 6. Providence has placed you in the midst of thoughtless and unpardoned men. What a beautiful thing it would be if you could win some of them to the Saviour! Will you not try? You will have many opportunities of speaking a word in season. The sick, you ma
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
n that day to their usual places of worship, and to join in prayer to Almighty God, that He will graciously restore to our beloved country the blessings of peace and security. In faith whereof I have hereunto set my hand at the city of Richmond on the twenty-seventh day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. Jefferson Davis. Again do I call the people of the Confederacy—a people who believe that the Lord reigneth, and that His overruling Providence ordereth all things—to unite in prayer and humble submission under His chastening hand, and to beseech His favor on our suffering country. It is meet that when trials and reverses befall us, we should seek to take home to our hearts and consciences the lessons which they teach, and profit by the selfexamination for which they prepare us. Had not our successes on land and sea made us self-confident and forgetful of our reliance on Him? Had not the love of lucre eaten like a gangrene into
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 3: influence of Christian officers—continued. (search)
drink when I am thirsty. The habit has become as delightful as regular. Jackson had a firm and unshaken trust in the promises of God and His superintending Providence under all circumstances, and it was his habitual practice to pray for and trust in Divine guidance under every circumstance of trial. His friend, Elder Lyle—gratitude, and asks only a similar confidence in the future. But his chief duty to-day, and that of the army, is to recognize devoutly the hand of a protecting Providence in the brilliant successes of the last three days, which have given us the results of a great victory without great losses, and to make the oblation of our thawhat is religiously, they naturally underestimate the importance of religion. From what I have said, you may think I am despondent; but, thanks to an ever kind Providence, such is not the case. I do not know where so many men, brought together without any religious test, exhibit so much religious feeling. The striking feature i
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 4: influence of Christian officers—concluded. (search)
owed in my childhood comes over your loving son. If I have ever caused you needless trouble, let me now ask your forgiveness. All that I am, all the happiness I have ever enjoyed, is, I believe, due to you, and from you in great measure, under Providence, comes my hope of immortal life. I thank God that I can and do love, from my heart of hearts, all who are near to me—father, mother, grandma (God bless her), brothers, sisters, wife, children, all. . . . . . I pray and hope that I may be spthe general above described, and he may do incalculable good. If still unconverted, ask if he has a right not only to slight his own soul, but by his example and influence to be ruining the souls of others. Are you an officer yourself? Has Providence placed you as a leader to your fellow-men, and shall you lead them to perdition? Parents ought to become Christians for the sake of their children, besides personal considerations; and so ought officers to become Christians for the sake of the
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 5: Bible and colportage work. (search)
t should be paid upon the debt until it was liquidated. We could not, for a moment, entertain such a proposition. We are only too thankful that God has in his Providence put in our hands the means of supplying your wants. Into the political question which now agitates the States of America it is not our province to enter. We hroach to any people. It is vain to speak of the justice of our cause, unless we seek upon that cause the blessing of heaven, and use the instrumentality which Providence places in our hands. The speaker believed that piety will make a man a truer patriot and a braver soldier. It assures him that God is his friend; that all thi of its issues. We give their names: The Evils of Gaming; a Letter to a Friend in the Army, by Rev. J. B. Jeter, D. D.— Swearing, by Hon. J. L. M. Curry— God's Providence, a Source of Comfort and Courage to Christians, by Rev. A. M. Poindexter, D. D.— For the Confederate army, by Hon. M. J. Wellborn.— David, by Professor Geo. E.
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
opportunity offered. On this march he preached a very able sermon on Special Providence, in the course of which he used this emphatic language: Men, you need not be lson frequently met Dr. Dabney and discussed with him his doctrine of Special Providence, and when upon one occasion he heard him directing the men who were under heatrees and a stone wall, and to put such things between themselves and Special Providence. But Dr. Dabney promptly replied: Why, Major, you do not understand the doctrine of Special Providence. I believe it, and teach it with all my heart, but I look upon those trees and that stone wall as a very special providence for the men at Providences. Major Nelson was convinced, and accepted the doctrine of Special Providence as Dr. Dabney expounded it. I remember that, remaining for a season with tr ears, and (forgetful of Dr. Dabney's application of the doctrine of Special Providence) I found myself constantly dodging to the no small amusement of the men. At l
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 9: State of religion in 1861-62. (search)
e Sixth Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers, near Richmond, says: I am happy to report to you the manifest tokens of the presence of the Spirit among us, even in these times of strife and battle. I do believe that these solemn visitations of Providence have been His chosen way of touching many a heart. There are earnest desires awakened in many a bosom, which I trust will lead them to the Cross. I believe there are many of our brave men lying on their hard pallets in the hospitals who are nrist seem to be in the full enjoyment of faith. I am happy, says another minister, to report the manifest tokens of the presence of the Spirit among us, even in these times of strife and battle. I do believe that these solemn visitations of Providence have been His chosen way of touching many a heart. There are earnest desires awakened in many a bosom, which I trust will lead them to the Cross. I believe there are many of our brave men lying on their hard pallets in the hospitals who are n
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 10: revivals in the Lower Valley and around Fredericksburg. (search)
t I am pardoned. I exhorted him to confess all to his family, and to make a fresh consecration of himself to his Saviour. And as I thought of his experience, and that of his friend, I could not but be impressed by the mysterious way in which God works. He had here made use of a backslider to lead a wicked companion to Jesus, and then used the converted man to lead the backslider to repentance. One other interesting incident, in like manner illustrating God's gracious and mysterious Providence, I will mention. One evening, just before night, a large body of troops marched by our camp. In one of the regiments was a very intelligent young man, from Norfolk, who, not being able, on account of sickness, to keep up with his regiment, stopped at our camp to rest, about the usual hour for service. He listened with the deepest interest to the preached word. I dwelt, in my sermon, on God's mysterious dealings with His people, and endeavored to show His faithfulness in afflicting us,
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
a, have been without a chaplain the most of the time since they entered the service. It has seemed to me that we have been neglected, and that none cared for our spiritual welfare; that we were abandoned, each one to pursue his own course down the road to sin and destruction, without any spiritual adviser to tell us of our duties, and warn us of impending danger. But thanks be to God, He who rules and watches over us, and is ever mindful of the welfare of poor erring man, has in His good Providence directed the steps of Brother Carroll, and is manifesting His love and presence in our midst in the conviction and conversion of souls. A deep and powerful conviction of sin prevails, and religion has become the chief topic of conversation with many. Many of the noble sons of Alabama, who have stemmed the tide of many battles in defence of civil liberty, are now bowing humbly at the Cross, endeavoring to throw off the shackles of sin, and seeking liberty from the thraldom of Satan. How
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 12: progress of the work in 1864-65. (search)
our proportion. The only thing that would palliate the conscription of ministers would be that it would fill up all the vacant chaplaincies. I learn, from a private source, that Rev. L. W. Allen, of Virginia (widely known and loved), who was captured while serving as captain of a cavalry company, is engaged at Fort Johnson in carrying on a very interesting revival, in which a number of our officers have professed conversion and been baptized in the lake. How wonderful are the ways of Providence! army of Northern Virginia, March 1, 1864. Perhaps I can give a better idea of our work in the army by a few quotations from my diary. Saturday, February 20. Preached to a large and very attentive congregation in Davis's Mississippi Brigade, and after preaching received five for baptism. They are having a most precious revival in this brigade, and Rev. Mr. Witherspoon, the efficient chaplain of the Forty-second Mississippi, is alone, very much broken down, and calling loudly for
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