Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) or search for Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
Chapter 4: Bristol County. The county of Bristol is bounded north by Norfolk County, east by Plymouth, south-east by Buzzard's Bay, and west by the counties of Providence, Bristol, and Newport, Rhode Island. It is divided into nineteen municipalities, of which New Bedford, Fall River, and Taunton are cities. The entire population of the county in 1860 was 93,794, in 1865 it was 89,339; being a decrease in five years of 4,455. The population in 1870 was 102,886, being an increase in five years of 13,191. The total valuation of the county in 1860 was $66,294,526, in 1865 it was $87,428,503; being an increase in five years of $21,133,983. This county gives rise to several streams, which fall into Massachusetts and Narragansett Bays, the most important of which is Taunton Great River, that in times past was famous for its herring fisheries. New Bedford and Dartmouth are well known as being the chief seats of the whale-fishery. Fall River and Taunton are largely engaged in ma
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
e selectmen in the recruiting of men and the payment of bounties. A series of resolutions were read and adopted by the meeting, of which we copy the following:— Whereas in the course of events, although long spared, many of our friends, neighbors, and townsmen have been stricken down upon the battle-field, several of whom have fallen to rise no more in this life, and many more lie suffering from terrible wounds, from the effects of which they never can recover, except by the smiles of Providence and the tenderest care of friends; therefore-- Resolved, That we, the citizens of Methuen, in town-meeting assembled, thus publicly desire to declare and express our grief for the lost and their friends, and our interest in, and sympathy for, the wounded and their relatives. That we regret exceedingly to learn that not less than thirteen, and perhaps more, of our men have been laid low in death as sacrifices upon the altar of our country. Resolved, That we hereby extend our tenderes
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
inction and former political difference in one great party for the support of the Union, the laws and the Constitution; 3d, That the most decisive measures be adopted to crush the Rebellion and uphold the Government; 4th, Recognized the hand of Providence in uniting the people of the Free States, and a portion of the people in the Slave States, to support the measures of the President to maintain the Union; 5th, That in the spirit of the early patriots of this town who took so prominent a part ioic conduct of the officers and soldiers of Company B. Twenty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and our other fellow citizens of Milford engaged in the battles of Roanoke and Newbern. Resolved, That our thanks are due to an overruling Providence, and our congratulations to our fellow citizens in the fields aforesaid, that amid perils by sea, in the camp, and in the shock of battle, so few have paid for their patriotism with their lives; that the patient endurance of these our fellow ci