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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
eliver the same lecture on your return trip homeward at Portland, Providence, and perhaps, at other cities in New England. I think the old alf-broken by camp-disease, and enervated by student's toil. But Providence, replied he, will preserve your health, if he designs to use you.iver, which lashes Shields back to his covert. Jackson trusted Providence, and here Providence took care of him in a most timely way. Our CProvidence took care of him in a most timely way. Our Colonel Crutchfield, detained amidst his captors in the village street, shall tell how the intervention looked from his point of view. The cavxpected to hold Fremont in check. He replied: By the blessing of Providence, I hope to be back by ten o'clock. Here then we have the disclphy. There is an omniscient Mind which purposes, an ever present Providence which superintends; so that when the event has finally disclosed ts; a blunder which no government would be allowed by a righteous Providence to repeat often, with impunity; because it is as truly a law of G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
during the war have now become the property of the nation. Moreover, we might just as well admit them now as to leave them to posterity to admire. The invitation extended to you is offered in good faith, and has no ulterior political object whatever. You will not be expected to arrange your lecture to suit our fancies, but to say whatever you think is proper and right. If the proposition is acceptable to you, I think that we can make arrangements for you to deliver the same lecture on your return trip homeward at Portland, Providence, and perhaps, at other cities in New England. I think the old soldiers of the Grand Army would be very glad to lend their assistance in aiding you to obtain funds for the use of the Southern Historical Society; for the truth must prevail in the end. Furthermore we hope this friendly offer on our part will be received in a true soldierly spirit. Very respectfully, Aug. C. Hamlin, Chairman of Committee. To General Fitzhugh Lee, Virginia.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
sleet of the ungenial spring, Winter lingering in the lap of spring,—stood calm, patient, modest, yet serious, as though abashed at the meanest man's reverence for him; but at sternest peril unabashed. After most thoughtful, yea, feminine care of food and fire for me, he took me apart saying, I am glad that you have come. But I told him that I was come, I feared, uselessly, only to reveal my unfitness, and retire; already half-broken by camp-disease, and enervated by student's toil. But Providence, replied he, will preserve your health, if he designs to use you. I was unused to arms, and ignorant of all military art. You can learn, said he. When would you have me assume my office? Rest to-day, and study the Articles of war, and begin to-morrow. But I have neither outfit, nor arms, nor horse, for immediate service. My quartermaster shall lend them, until you procure your own. But I have a graver disqualification, which candor requires me to disclose to you, first of mortals: I a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
wn an iron storm across the river, which lashes Shields back to his covert. Jackson trusted Providence, and here Providence took care of him in a most timely way. Our Colonel Crutchfield, detained Providence took care of him in a most timely way. Our Colonel Crutchfield, detained amidst his captors in the village street, shall tell how the intervention looked from his point of view. The cavalry Colonel commanding Shields's advance had not more than disarmed him, when a Yankeehow long a time he would be expected to hold Fremont in check. He replied: By the blessing of Providence, I hope to be back by ten o'clock. Here then we have the disclosure of his real plan, to whdid it. That was his philosophy. There is an omniscient Mind which purposes, an ever present Providence which superintends; so that when the event has finally disclosed His will, the good man has focritical victory without fruits; a blunder which no government would be allowed by a righteous Providence to repeat often, with impunity; because it is as truly a law of God's administration, as of Hi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
pon Brigadier-General Preston and his brigade commanders, Brigadier-General Gracie, and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, I cannot bestow higher praise than to say, that their conduct and example were such as to convert a body of troops, but few of whom had before been under fire, into a division of veterans in their first battle. Stewart's veterans maintained the reputation they had won on many fields. Preston's troops emulated their example and equalled them in merit. The recapitulation of the heavy losses sustained in both divisions, is a sad testimony of the soldierly qualities of the survivors. Few troops, who have suffered so heavily, have been victorious on the field of their losses. But the result is only another evidence of the invincible spirit of our people, which, under the guidance of Providence, must finally win us our independence as a nation. I am, Colonel, very respectfully, Youth obedient servant, S. B. Buckner, Major-General, lately commanding Buckner's Corps.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A narrative of Stuart's Raid in the rear of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
im the least excited under fire or elsewhere. When Stuart reached the ford he never dismounted. He sat erect in his saddle and occasionally caught hold of his long flowing beard, which was a habit of his when his schemes were not working smoothly. He did not long remain in this state of mind, for he very soon discovered a passage through which he and his whole command could escape. A mile or more below this ford on the Chickahominy, where the county road crosses the river leading from Providence. Forge to Charles City Courthouse, were the ruins of Jones's bridge, which had been destroyed by fire by the Confederates when this portion of the Peninsula was evacuated. The abutments and a few of the piers were all that remained of the old bridge, which Stuart at once determined to rebuild. Working parties were organized and began to tear down an old farm house which stood in a field near by, the timber of which suited admirably for the bridge. The great genius of Stuart was now f