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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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and there are about sixty field-pieces at his disposal, and a force of about ten squadrons of cavalry. Here follows an account of McClellan's Division in Western Virginia. The division under Gen. Patterson is about 22,000 strong, and has three batteries of artillery attached to it; and Gen. Mansfield, who commands the army Lee and Beauregard to 70,000 men at the least. He is the best officer in the Confederate army, and it is believed here that he is already away operating in Western Virginia. There is a suspicious silence in the despatches and telegrams from the West and South-Western camps of the Federalists which justifies the secessionist rumward the Confederates. No one seemed to know, however, what Beauregard and Lee are doing, but it is affirmed that Johnston has gone off with a corps towards Western Virginia once more, and that an insurrection in Baltimore and Maryland is only prevented by the reenforcements which are pouring in to Gen. Banks, and by the anticipa
o be doubtful whether the Confederate troops, flushed with success, intend to attack Washington. As their object will be accomplished by clearing the secessionist States of Federal troops, sound policy would seem to dictate that the enemy should be quietly left to improve their organization in the comparative security of Arlington Heights. Actual warfare in the United States has now been waged for several months. Every advantage, with the exception of General McClellan's successes in Western Virginia, has been on the side of the South. What has the North gained in exchange? A disgraceful defeat, an amount of taxation which is unparalleled in the history of European nations, the utter subversion of constitutional liberty, and, by means of prohibitory tariffs, the alienation of the sympathies of their best customers and friends. It appears, further, that slavery is not the cause of this lamentable contest. It arises from commercial jealousy, and thus we see that in America the gre
revolution that has been inaugurated in the South; they maintaining that those who are to have the privilege of voting ought to be of the educated class, and that the legislation ought not to be represented by the laboring classes. We in Western Virginia, and, as I suppose, in the whole of Virginia, adopted the great doctrine of the fathers of the Republic, that in the people resides all power; and that embraced all people. This revolution has been inaugurated with a view of making a distinction upon the principles that I have indicated. We of Western Virginia have not been consulted upon that subject. The large body of your citizens in the eastern part of the State have not been consulted upon that subject. American institutions lie near to the heart of the masses of the people, all over this country, from one end of it to the other, though not as nearly perhaps in Louisiana, Georgia, and Texas, as in some of the Western and Northern States. This idea has been covertly ad
vocates. The sections of the country in which the largest slave interests have existed in this State, have heretofore been the most decided in support of the Union. The votes given at the last November and February elections in Eastern and Western Virginia, will slow that the slaveholders themselves considered the safety of their property as dependent upon the maintenance of the Union. Another pertinent fact may be mentioned in this connection. It is that in sections where slaves are numeroulways much easier to introduce a system of mob-law and intimidation to control the votes of the people. The constant apprehension of servile insurrection makes the master an easy subject of control in a crisis like the present. Eastern and Western Virginia are illustrations of the truth of this statement. What affiliations this great conspiracy has had in the Northern States remain yet unknown. The spirit which has been aroused throughout the North, has carried all opposition before it. Bu
Doc. 34.-proclamation of Gen. McClellan. Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Grafton, (Va.,) June 23, 1861. To the Inhabitants of Western Virginia: The army of this department, headed by Virginia troops, is rapidly occupying all Western Virginia. This is done in cooperation with and in support of such civil authoritiWestern Virginia. This is done in cooperation with and in support of such civil authorities of the State as are faithful to the Constitution and laws of the United States. The proclamation issued by me, under date of May 26th, 1861, will be strictly maintained. Your houses, families, property, and all your rights will be religiously respected. We are enemies to none but armed rebels, and those voluntarily giving th to destroy. Take nothing, destroy nothing, unless you are ordered to do so by your general officers. Remember that I have pledged my word to the people of Western Virginia that their rights in person and property shall be respected. I ask every one of you to make good this promise in its broadest sense. We have come here to
Doc. 35.-proclamations of Gov. Letcher, June 14, 1861. To the People of North-Western Virginia: The sovereign people of Virginia, unbiassed, and by their own free choice, have, by a majority of nearly one hundred thousand qualified voters, severed the ties that heretofore bound them to the Government of the United States, and united this Commonwealth with the Confederate States. That our people have the right to institute a new Government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness, was proclaimed by our fathers, and it is a right which no freeman should ever relinquish. The State of Virginia has now, the second time in her history, asserted this right, and it is the duty of every Virginian to acknowledge her act when ratified by such a majority, and to give his willing cooperation to make good the declaration. All her people have voted. Each has taken his chance
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 59: a Virginian who is not a traitor: response of Lieut. Mayo, U. S. N., to the proclamation of Gov. Letcher. (search)
nvite any man through their Governor, whether an efficient or worthy Virginian or even the bugbear of a Yankee resident of Virginia, to become an honorable deserter. Even with the tangible evidence before me, I am in doubt as to the identity of the ordinance. I feel assured, sir, that the fifty odd loyal and true men-reduced by some secret political hocuspocus to a baker's dozen — who voted against secession, did their best to save the State from this execrable abuse of its people. Western Virginia, certainly, does not lend itself to such invitations. If I remember aright, sir, the leading State Rights men of Virginia declared, at the time of the Hartford Convention, that the secession of a State from the Federal Union was treason. How can leading State Rights men from Virginia now invite the military officers of that same Federal Union to commit the sin which then was so damnable? What system of morals works the change? John Letcher, I am not a politician, though I am a Vir
nfusion, and he is now retreating on the road to St. George. I have ordered Gen. Morris to follow him up closely. I have telegraphed for the two Pennsylvania regiments at Cumberland to join Gen. Hill at Rowlesburg. The General is concentrating all his troops at Rowlesburg, and he will cut off Garnett's retreat near West Union, or, if possible, at St. George. I may say that we have driven out some ten thousand troops, strongly intrenched, with the loss of 11 killed and 35 wounded. The provision returns here show Garnett's force to have been ten thousand men. They were Eastern Virginians, Tennesseans, Georgians, and, I think, Carolinians. To-morrow I can give full details, as to prisoners, &c. I trust that Gen. Cox has, by this time, driven Wise out of the Kanawha Valley. In that case, I shall have accomplished the object of liberating Western Virginia. I hope the General-in-Chief will approve of my operations. G. B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. commanding the Dep. of Ohio.
eorge. We have completely annihilated the enemy in Western Virginia. Our loss is but thirteen killed and not more than Major-General U. S. A. McClellan's operations in Western Virginia. U. S. Camp, near Huttonsville, Randolph Co., Vait will be seen that the backbone of the rebellion in Western Virginia is completely broken. The question is settled forevely 14, 1861 The campaign of Maj.-Gen. McClellan in Western Virginia has terminated in the complete destruction and rout olime was Gov. Letcher's proclamation to the people of Western Virginia, and fearful was the retribution to be visited upon tof Virginia, and commander in the Confederate army in Western Virginia, of whom all that is mortal lies but a few feet from on by ten o'clock. Thus ends the first campaign in Western Virginia, and my correspondence. The army of Gen. Morris was he narrative of Gen. McClellan's triumphant career in Western Virginia, the uppermost impression left in the mind is that it
very often occur. Jefferson Davis takes a ride in the evening through the city on a fine gray horse, and excites considerable enthusiasm among the citizens, with whom he is rather popular. Alexander H. Stephens was not in the city when our informant left there, but was expected soon. All the secession Cabinet, and a good many members of the Congress, which is to meet on the 20th of July, had arrived there. The secessionists expressed great indignation at the proposed secession of Western Virginia from the eastern part of that State, and of East from West Tennessee, which they thought entirely unconstitutional and rebellious; but when they heard that there was a disposition upon the part of Western Kentucky to secede from the loyal portion of that State, they declared it to be a very righteous and perfectly legal movement. As an evidence of the aristocratic tendencies of secession, and of the growing unpopularity of it among the working classes, our informant states that the R
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