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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

enate, on motion of Mr. Wilson, insisted on its amendments, agreed to a committee of conference, and Mr. Trumbull, Mr. Lane, of Indiana, and Mr. Van Winkle, of West-Virginia, were appointed managers. On the second, Mr. Trumbull, from the committee of conference, reported: That the House recede from its disagreement to the first ity under the act. The vote was then taken on the substitute; and it was lost — yeas, seventy-five; nays, seventy-seven. On the twenty-eighth, Mr. Blair, of West-Virginia, moved to reconsider the vote on Mr. Smithers's substitute. Mr. Holman moved to lay the potion on the table — yeas, seventy-three; nays, eighty-five. Mr. Blaimmittee on Military Affairs. On motion of Mr. Hendricks, of Indiana, the fifth section, relative to State and local bounties, was stricken out. Mr. Willey, of West-Virginia, moved to add a section, discharging any soldier belonging to any regiment or organization mustered out of the service, who enlisted under a promise given by t
Doc. 4.-secessionists of West Virginia. Major-General Hunter's order. headquarters Department of West Virginia, in the field, Valley of Shenandoah, May 24, 1864. Sir: Your name has been reported to me, with evidence, that you are one of the leading secession sympathizers in this valley, and that you countenance and abet the bushwhackers and guer-rillas who infest the woods and mountains of this region, swooping out on the roads to plunder and outrage loyal residents, falling upon and firing into defenseless wagon trains, and assassinating soldiers of this command who may chance to be placed in exposed positions. These practices are not recognized by the laws of war of any civilized nation, nor are the persons engaged therein entitled to any other treatment than that due, by the universal code of justice, to pirates, murderers, and other outlaws. But from the difficulties of the country, the secret aid and information given to those bushwhackers by persons of your cla
, your obedient servant, J. C. Brown, Brigadier-General. Report of Brigadier-General B. G. Humphreys. Headquarters brigade, near Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct. 8, 1863. Major J. M. Goggin, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: In obedience to orders, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this brigade in the action of the twentieth of September: The brigade arrived on the battle-field, at Alexander's Bridge, at two o'clock A. M., on the twentieth, from Western Virginia. About ten o'clock General Kershaw ordered me into line of battle on his left. Heavy firing was heard in our front, when we advanced in line parallel to the Lafayette road. Crossing the road, we found the enemy on a hill at the edge of an old field. General Kershaw at once engaged him and drove him from his position. At this time General Bushrod Johnson rode up to me and requested me to move my brigade to General Kershaw's right, as the enemy were massing in that direction and thre
ed, but in time, we hope, for a successful campaign. Buell has certainly fallen back from the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and will probably not make a stand this side of Nashville, if there. He is now fortifying at that place. General E. K. Smith, reinforced by two brigades from this army, has turned Cumberland Gap, and is now marching on Lexington, Kentucky. General Morgan (Yankey) is thus cut off from all supplies. General Humphrey Marshall is to enter Eastern Kentucky from Western Virginia. We shall thus have Buell pretty well disposed of. Sherman and Rosecrans we leave to you and Price, satisfied you can dispose of them, and we confidently hope to meet you upon the Ohio. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General, commanding. M. M. Kimmel. General Armstrong to General Price. Middleburg, five miles South of Bolivar, August 30, 1862. Major Sneed, Assistant Adjutant-General: Just finished whipping the enemy in from off Bolivar. Ran in
hed the means of all its usefulness. From the ninth day of April, 1862, to the first day of September, 1865, we have received, registered, lodged, fed, aided, and clothed sick, wounded, and disabled soldiers, coming from almost every State, to the number of 86,073: Maine11,330 New Hampshire7,216 Vermont5,420 Massachusetts18,546 Rhode Island2,655 Connecticut5,451 New York11,850 New Jersey1,253 Pennsylvania5,783 Delaware391 Maryland285 District of Columbia334 Virginia189 West Virginia18 North Carolina56 South Carolina46 Georgia50 Alabama19 Mississippi625 Louisiana65 Texas22 Ohio2,523 Indiana1,514 Illinois1,366 Michigan442 Wisconsin1,035 Minnesota163 Florida10 Iowa219 Kentucky140 Tennessee20 Arkansas6 Missouri77 Kansas5 California31 Vet. Res. Corps4,234 U. S. Navy74 U. S. Troops2,097 U. S. Colored Troops509   Total86,073 We also received, welcomed, and entertained New England regiments passing through our city on the way to the field, c
Doc. 68.-the fight at Rogersville, Tenn. Report of Major-General Sam Jones. headquarters Department W. Virginia and E. Tennessee, Dublin, December 11, 1863. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General C. S. A., Richmond: General: I have the honor to forward, with this, the reports of Major-General R. Ransom, Jr., and his subordinate commanders, of the attack on the enemy near Rogersville, Tennessee, and the reports of Brigadier-General John Echols and subordinate commanders headquarters Jones' brigade, near Carter's Station, Tennessee, November 13, 1863. Major T. Rowland, A. A. G., District S. W. Va. and East Tennessee: Major: In accordance with enclosed instructions from headquarters, district of south-western Virginia and East Tennessee, my command rendezvoused at Bauckman's Ford on the fourth instant. On inquiry, finding if it crossed here there would be danger of alarming the enemy, I deemed it best to cross near Spurgeon's mill, and camped for the nig