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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ers of self-control, and rare equipose of mind which so distinguished him in after life, whether in prosperity or adversity. From his mother, who died early in life, and who is described as a woman of handsome person, fine intellect, and sterling worth, he may well be supposed to have inherited those softer traits of character which made his hearthstone a happy one, and charmed the home circle and the friends who gathered around it. At fifteen years of age he was sent to a school in Western Virginia, and afterward to Transylvania, where he conceived the idea of entering the United States navy. But his father discouraged him from this enterprise and sent him in 1819 on a visit to his elder brother, Josiah Stoddard Johnston, who, with his other elder brothers, had moved to Rapides parish, in the State of Louisiana. His elder brother, Josiah Stoddard Johnston, had already become a distinguished citizen in this State, subsequently its representative in Congress and United States Sena
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
ers of self-control, and rare equipose of mind which so distinguished him in after life, whether in prosperity or adversity. From his mother, who died early in life, and who is described as a woman of handsome person, fine intellect, and sterling worth, he may well be supposed to have inherited those softer traits of character which made his hearthstone a happy one, and charmed the home circle and the friends who gathered around it. At fifteen years of age he was sent to a school in Western Virginia, and afterward to Transylvania, where he conceived the idea of entering the United States navy. But his father discouraged him from this enterprise and sent him in 1819 on a visit to his elder brother, Josiah Stoddard Johnston, who, with his other elder brothers, had moved to Rapides parish, in the State of Louisiana. His elder brother, Josiah Stoddard Johnston, had already become a distinguished citizen in this State, subsequently its representative in Congress and United States Sena
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correction of errors in statement of Governor Anderson, and letter of General Echols. (search)
e specified. Soon after he took command of the Army of Northern Virginia, he insisted upon being relieved of the general command to which I had previously assigned him, and his repeated request in that regard was granted. I very frequently consulted him about other matters than those of the army under his command, and did so on several occasions about affairs in West Virginia. On one occasion, I think it must have been about the time to which General Echols alludes, some gentlemen in Western Virginia requested me to appoint Custis Lee to the command of that department. He was then, and had for some time been, the senior officer of my staff, and my observation of him, both in the office and at various times in the field, had well satisfied me of his ability. The case was one in which his unwillingness to interfere with other officers had no just application. I sent for him and offered him the command, stating the circumstances of the case; he left me without any expression of his