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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 272 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 100 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 90 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 74 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 70 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) or search for West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

t there is, in my opinion, nothing more reasonable or probable than that such an advance should and will be made, especially if our forces be withdrawn. Who should we not expect an advance? Is it not to their interest to overrun as much of Western Virginia as possible, and to do it in the shortest period of time? Have the rich counties of Greenbrier and Monroe no attractions for an army of plunderers and robbers? Would it not be worth something to the Lincoln Government to get hold of the weawha valley with a force of less than 20,000 men, leaving Rosencranz in his rear, and the Kanawha river in fine boating condition, by means of which any quantity of Ohio troops might be sent up in front in a few hours. The great need of Western Virginia is troops, and if over the Pierpont Government is to be overthrown, we must have them. We need 25,000 effective men in the direction of Cheat Mountain, and 25,000 on the James River and Kanawha Turnpike. Had such a force been furnished in t
The battle-field and the camp.[Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Fauquier Co., Va., Nov. 12 1861. To travel over this part of the country may probably suggest to a very vivid imagination the character of the marches our troops in Western Virginia undergo, though comparatively the country here is smooth and the roads good. If a country is "tolerably level" where you are no sooner down one hill than another appears before you, and if roads are "pretty good" where you are perpetually jolted and jumbled over rocks as big as cheeses, up and down natural steps, into deep mud holes, on one side the carriage, till your companion is unexpectedly jerked into your lap, then immediately pitched back again by a deep rut in the opposite direction — if this, at the rate of three miles an hour, is "pretty good traveling," may Heaven preserve our poor men in their forced marches through the mountains where roads are really admitted to be bad — bad even to those whose fortitude, phi
Arrival of prisoners. --Some few additions to the number of Federal prisoners here have been made within three days past; among them two from Western Virginia, where they were captured while in the prosecution of business for Rosencranz, such as mail and express riding and other adventurous enterprises of a similar nature.
Gen. Crittenden. There is a well authenticated rumor that major General Crittenden has been assigned to the military division embracing East Tennessee and a portion of South western Virginia.
n. Floyd's Brigade, marched some two hundred miles to Guyandotte, and completely surprised the Yankee troops in the town, numbering two hundred and fifty, under the command of Col. Whaley, one of the traitor members of Congress, elected from Western Virginia. Col. Clarkson arrived at the village about 8 o'clock A. M., took possession of the bridge, and cut off all retreat.--The fight lasted about one hour, the Yankees fighting from the houses and places of concealment. He took ninety-eight prisfor Governor by both Houses, giving a majority for Lubbock of between 1,400 and 1,500. Affecting scene. From the Lynchburg Republican, of the 23d instant, we take the following: Among the prisoners brought here yesterday from Western Virginia, was a brother of our townsman, John J. Wade, and a native of Amherst county, who, recreant to all the duties of patriotism, and deaf to the calls of his native State for aid, had turned against her in the hour of her trial and joined in wit