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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,756 1,640 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 979 67 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 963 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 742 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 694 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 457 395 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 449 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 427 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 420 416 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 410 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Washington (United States) or search for Washington (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
s. He had been told by stragglers, that our army had been defeated. He stopped his horse in the middle of the little stream, stood up in his stirrups (the palest, sternest face I ever saw), and cried to the great crowd of soldiers: I am President Davis; follow me back to the field. General Jackson did not hear distinctly. I told him who it was, and what he said. He stood up, took off his cap and cried: We have whipped them; they ran like sheep. Give me 10,000 men and I will take Washington city to-morrow. Who doubts now that he could have done so? When, in May, 1862, he whipped Banks at Winchester and had, what seemed then and even now, the audacity to follow him to Harper's Ferry, he not only knew the number and condition of Banks' army, but in his mind he clearly saw the locality and strength of the armies of Fremont and McDowell, gradually converging from the east and west towards Strasburg to cut of his retreat. He knew the leaders of these hostile forces, their skil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
known as Buchanan Spring, so there was nothing for me to do but walk about twelve miles. It was then 11 o'clock at night. I placed in my haversack a small piece of hambone and a loaf of bread, which good Mrs. Knight gave me, little dreaming that I would get nothing more to eat for more than three days. Orders to burn. Reaching my quarters in the city about 2 o'clock A. M. of the 3d, my adjutant, Linden Kent, a youth about eighteen (who afterwards became a distinguished lawyer in Washington city, and died a few years since), showed me an order from General Ewell, directing all the tobacco warehouses, then full of tobacco, to be burned at a certain signal. He and Captain Herron, of Orange, the ranking officer in my absence (Captain W. T. Early, of Albemarle, and Major James Strange, of Fluvanna, then being absent, sick), had made all the arrangements necessary to carry this order into effect. I directed Captain Herron and Adjutant Kent, so soon as the signal was given, to fire
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
ry of the 23d Regiment, which constantly shared its fortunes through it all—thence again to the lines at Petersburg, and down to the end. The next fighting done by the brigade was as a part of Early's command in that truly great march on Washington city. The brigade was in all the battles of that command, and made the flank movement with Gordon's Division at Bell Grove and Cedar Creek. In this battle it had a hand-to-hand conflict with the 6th Army Corps. It captured, with the aid of Batr be taken. I moved forward, and as we struck the bridge on our side the enemy was clearing it on the other side. The retreat and pursuit began, which continued for about two miles. We then advanced as far as Blair's farm, in full view of Washington city, but soon deemed it wise to come back into Virginia. Of course the operations in the valley under Early, already given, were subsequent to the action and events recorded immediately above. In the valley campaign, the brigade was transfe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hon. James Murray Mason, of Mason & Slidell fame. (search)
to be afforded the opportunities for the aspirations he indulged. Honest, he was trusted; discreet, he was relied on to do justice and judgment; and brave, all felt assured that he could make the sacrifice when called on. He did nobly make it at the last extremity, without a murmur and without soiling his escutcheon; he made no palinode of his principles, and soiled not his good faith. At that day Winchester was, though less than now, freely accessible to Baltimore, Alexandria and Washington city. He was often at the two latter places and had full intercourse with the leading men of the day. He had the highest admiration for John Randolph, of Roanoke, and Mr. Randolph had an exalted admiration for him. It was, if we remember aright, in 1828, when the presidential canvass was going on between General A. Jackson and Mr. John Quincy Adams, that Mr. Randolph made his inimitable speech in the Senate of the United States, comparing wisdom and knowledge, the personations of which were
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A horror of the war. [from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] (search)
act of barbarity shall compel me reluctantly to adopt a line of policy repugnant to humanity. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John S. Mosby, Lieutenant-Colonel. We, the committee appointed by Mosby Camp to solicit subscriptions to erect a monument at Front Royal, Va., to the memory of our six comrades—Anderson, Carter, Jones, Overby, Love and Rhodes—who, while prisoners of war, were hung or shot to death, by the order of General Custer, in the year 1864. The memory of these brave boys, who met an untimely death in defence of their country, deserves to be perpetuated, and we earnestly appeal to all survivors of the 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, to aid in rendering long-delayed justice to our fallen comrades. All subscriptions should be sent to the Treasurer, W. Ben. Palmer, No. 1321 Cary street, Richmond, Va., or to any member of the committee. W. Ben. Palmer, Richmond, Va., J. W. Hammond, Alexandria, Va., Robert M. Harrover, Washington, D. C., Committ
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
f Co. E, to succeed Captain Dockery; Lieutenant John E. Rheim, Co. G, was elected to succeed Captain Sharpe; George M. Yoder, Co. F, was elected second lieutenant to succeed H. L. Robards; George W. Flowers, Co. G, was elected first lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Rheim; Oliver H. Patterson, second lieutenant to succeed G. W. Flowers; D. G. McRae, Co. E, was elected second lieutenant to succeed Lieutenant Copell. On the 10th of February, 1823, the regiment was ordered to proceed to Washington, N. C., but on reaching Goldsboro the order was changed and the regiment ordered to Halifax, thence to Hamilton. On February 12, under orders from General Gatlin, the troops returned to Halifax, and then proceeded to Weldon to defend the bridge at that point, reaching Camp Leavenworth, on the east side of the river near Garysburg, on the 14th. The regiment remained here until the 18th, when it was ordered to Camp Floyd, on the west side of the river, near Weldon. While in camp at this pla
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
ys. He was not debtor. He gave more than he received. To the last, amid all his suffering, he was bright, cheerful, witty, and charming. To the many who gladly sought his company, he gave knowledge, instruction, and entertainment; and more than all, the pleasure of the sweet and edifying society of a lovely man. He died on July 29, 1896, and was buried with military honors. 2. Resolved, That we remember with gratitude, pride, and pleasure, his exalted character, his pure and manly life, and we cherish the remembrance. 3. Resolved, That our sorrow is not without hope. He served his generation faithfully and well. He lived unselfish, died poor, and entered with clean hands the court of divine equity. 4. Resolved, That these resolutions be spread upon the minutes, and copies thereof sent to the daughters of the deceased. (Signed.) R. B. Lewis, President Confederate Veteran Association, Washington, D. C. (Attest.) Chas. C. Ivey, Secretary C. V. A. February 4, 1897.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
he had endeavored to follow that of his Divine Master. Greetings from Washington. The following telegram from the Confederate Veterans' Association, of Washington, D. C., was read and received with applause: Washington, D. C., January 19, 1898. R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, Richmond, Va.: The ConfederatWashington, D. C., January 19, 1898. R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, Richmond, Va.: The Confederate Veterans' Association of Washington assembled to honor the name of our great leader, General R. E. Lee, send loving greetings to their comrades of Richmond, and remember with them a vow to keep green his memory. Robert I. Fleming, President. Adjutant J. Taylor Stratton was instructed to telegraph the following reply: Richmond, Va., January 19, 1898. Colonel Robert I. Fleming, President Confederate Veterans' Association, Washington, D. C.: R. E. Lee Camp, Confederate Veterans, reciprocates your kindly greeting, and pledges eternal fidelity to the memory of our illustrious chieftain. A. C. Peay, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding. Captain Park
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
their destination, but supposed we were selected for exchange. We remained all night in Sandusky, where it as very cold, but we were comfortable and enjoyed some privileges, not being strictly guarded. We left the next day on a train, and when we landed it was in Philadelphia. There we were imprisoned in the State Armory, where we were comfortable. We staid there some weeks, and then were under strict guard by negro soldiers. We left there on the 16th of June on a steamer for Washington city. On the way a plan was devised to seize the guard, capture the boat and run ashore. All were united, but the plot was foiled by the boat running up under a fort on the river. The commanding officer must have had some intimation or suspicion of our purpose, for from the fort, a gunboat went up the river with our steamer. Arriving in Washington we were taken to the Old Capitol, where we remained several weeks, with light rations, and then were carried to Fort Delaware. From this p