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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
en full of rumors of a great battle in Virginia, in which McClellan was signally defeated. Last night after we had all retired to our soldier couches, we were called up to hear a dispatch from General Randolph, Secretary of War, announcing a glorious victory for our arms. The battle commenced on Friday, and after two days desperate fighting, the enemy abandoned their camp, and fled. They recrossed the Chickahominy for the purpose of getting under the protection of their gunboats on the James river. Latest reports represent our army in hot pursuit of the retreating foe, and capturing many thousands of prisoners. I have been suffering for several days from an attack of acute rheumatism, but the good news puts me on my feet again. July 4th.—The Fourth of July, 1862, has passed unobserved and almost unknown. The principles for which our forefathers contended have been trampled beneath the feet of their unworthy descendents of the North, and we, their sons of the South are fightin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Small arms. (search)
Small arms. At the formation of the government, or at the beginning of the war, the arms at command were distributed as follows, as nearly as I can recollect: Rifles.Muskets. At Richmond, Va. (about)4,000 Fayetteville Arsenal, North Carolina (about)2,00025,000 Charleston Arsenal, South Carolina (about)2,000 20,000 Augusta Arsenal, Georgia (about)3,00028,000 Mount Vernon Arsenal, Alabama2,000 20,000 Baton Rouge Arsenal, Louisiana2,00027,000 —–—– 15,000120,000 There were at Richmond about 60, 000 old, worthless flint muskets, and at Baton Rouge about 10,000 old Hall's rifles and carbines. Besides the foregoing, there were at Little Rock, Ark., a few thousand stands, and some few at the Texas arsenals, increasing the aggregate of serviceable arms to, say, 143,000. To these must be added the arms owned by the several States and by military organizations throughout the country, giving, say, 150,000 in all for the use of the armies of the Confederacy. The rifles w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
valuable, and were soon abandoned. Lead was collected in considerable quantities throughout the country by the laborious exertions of agents employed for this purpose. The battle-field of Bull Run was fully gleaned, and much lead collected. By the close of 1861 the following arsenals and depots were at work, having been supplied with some machinery and facilities, and were producing the various munitions and equipments required: Augusta, Ga.; Charleston, S. C.; Fayetteville, N. C.; Richmond, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Memphis, Tenn.; Mount Vernon, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Montgomery, Ala.; Little Rock, Ark.; and San Antonio, Texas—altogether eight arsenals and four depots. It would, of course, have been better, had it been practicable, to have condensed our work and to have had fewer places of manufacture; but the country was deficient in the transportation which would have been required to place the raw material at a few arsenals. In this way only could we avail our
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
he Ordnance Department of the Confederate Government. Small arms. At the formation of the government, or at the beginning of the war, the arms at command were distributed as follows, as nearly as I can recollect: Rifles.Muskets. At Richmond, Va. (about)4,000 Fayetteville Arsenal, North Carolina (about)2,00025,000 Charleston Arsenal, South Carolina (about)2,000 20,000 Augusta Arsenal, Georgia (about)3,00028,000 Mount Vernon Arsenal, Alabama2,000 20,000 Baton Rouge Arsenal, Louisithe close of 1861 the following arsenals and depots were at work, having been supplied with some machinery and facilities, and were producing the various munitions and equipments required: Augusta, Ga.; Charleston, S. C.; Fayetteville, N. C.; Richmond, Va.; Savannah, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Memphis, Tenn.; Mount Vernon, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Montgomery, Ala.; Little Rock, Ark.; and San Antonio, Texas—altogether eight arsenals and four depots. It would, of course, have been better, had it been
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
n which we are engaged. A reverend friend, who did faithful and warmly appreciated work in one of the brigades of the Army of Northern Virginia, writes as follows on a postal card: St. Louis, December 26, 1883. Have not the most remote idea of not renewing my subscription. Will remit early in January. Fraternally, —— —— ——. Another gallant soldier writes as follows: Atlanta, Ga., December 14th, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir,—Inclosed I hand you draft for ten dollars ($10), to be placed to my credit for subscription to the Southern Historical papers. I know I am in arrears, but do not know how much. One thing I do know, and that is I do not want to be denied the pleasure of reading the papers every month. Whenever I am behind, jog me up. If the enclosed is worthy a place among the papers it is at your service. Or if it will better grace the waste basket, I am agreeable. Very tru
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sabine Pass. (search)
Sabine Pass. A Federal account—letter from Adjutant-General Frederic speed. [We cheerfully give place to the following letter, which is a different version from the account of Sabine Pass which has been received among Confederates, and is very different from the one which follows it. We publish without comments:] Vicksburg, Miss., September 27th, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—In the October issue of the Southern Historical Society papers you ask, Who will send us a detailed sketch of the heroic defence of Sabine Pass? and referring to the death of Jack White, quote from an unknown exchange the statement that White was one of the forty Irishmen who held Sabine Pass against the entire Federal fleet during the war, and received the personal thanks of Mr. Davis, &c. The statement further goes on to say that the Federal force consisted of three Federal brigades and a fleet of gun-boats, and adds, the d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
ebruary 6, 1884. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary of the Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va. My Dear Sir,—I have just obtained a very interesting and valuable document—being the orig W. W. Corcoran. office Southern Historical Society, No. 7, Library Floor State Capitol, Richmond, Va., February 7, 1884, W W. Corcoran. Esq., Vice-President Southern Historical Society for Distrhe scheme promises to be a splendid success: R. E. Lee camp, No. 1, Confederate veterans, Richmond, Va., January 15th, 1884. The above Camp of old Confeds see and feel the necessity for concen announces her death: Chicago, December 15th, 1883. Editor of Southern Historical Papers, Richmond, Va.: It is with profound sorrow that I announce the sudden death of Mrs. Sarah Bell Waller, a No. 1, which we would advise all to secure by ordering at once from Carlton McCarthy & Co., Richmond, Va. We have not room to say more now. The military operations of General Beauregard in the wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Further details of the death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
f all old Confederates, not only for his own contribution, but also for eliciting from Colonel Venable his graceful tribute to the accomplished soldier and chivalric gentleman whose name was among the dying words of both Lee and Jackson.] Richmond, Va., March 21, 1884. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—Some time since I noticed an account of the death of General A. P. Hill, which was written by Sergeant Tucker, of General Hill's staRichmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—Some time since I noticed an account of the death of General A. P. Hill, which was written by Sergeant Tucker, of General Hill's staff. Having seen General Hill only a short while before his death, and thinking Sergeant Tucker had left out (unintentionally) some facts that might be interesting to the soldiers, I sent the account to Colonel C. S. Venable, formerly of General R. E. Lee's staff, and I beg herewith to hand you for publication Colonel Venaable's letter to me, which I am sure will be read with interest by all. Let me say, that as General Hill came across the branch referred to by Sergeant Tucker, I met him (I
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph (search)
ys thereafter Colonel R. B. Boston, then Captain, was made Colonel, and so continued until killed in action at High Bridge on April 6th, 1865. I had the honor to belong to that gallant regiment, and know this to be true. I can never think of that soul of honor, Colonel Boston, without having my heart strangely stirred. Many of his men soon after, I candidly believe, almost envied his fate. Very truly yours, P. J. White. Auburn, Ala., January 31, 1884. Rev. Dr. J. William Jones, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—I was severely wounded in the second battle at Cold Harbor, but returned to my command about the last of August, to find a great many of my officers absent, on account of the numerous engagements and hard fighting in that campaign. The compilation of the War Records Office, is doubtless true, but it does not give the names of the real regimental commanders in my brigade at that time. They were as follows: Seventh North Carolina, Colonel William Lee Davidson. Do not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Drewry's Bluff, May 16th, 1864. (search)
me by the commanding General, while occupying the intermediate line of entrenchments around Drewry's Bluff, and confronting the enemy, who occupied the outer line of said entrenchments, extending his right through the woods in the direction of James river, while his left rested upon an elevated position across the railroad, with his masses immediately in front of our right and resting upon the railroad. The commanding General, seeing the right was the weak point of the enemy, determined uponve pieces of artillery by Hagood's brigade and a number of prisoners, besides killing and wounding many, and also in occupying the works. One regiment on the left of Hagood's brigade extended across the outer line of works in the direction of James river, which was ordered forward to connect with the right of General Ransom's division, but to my amazement found the enemy in strong force behind entrenchments. It was not intended that this regiment should attack the enemy in this position, as t
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